Updates from March, 2011 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • dbinkowski 9:15 am on March 7, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , charlie sheen, influencer marketing,   

    Using Celebrities To Generate Buzz Is Lazy — And It Doesn’t Work 

    Those who know me know that I am not a fan of celebrity endorsements to drive brand campaigns. Yes, the celebrity gives you some fake impressions, but it doesn’t actually benefit the brand. In fact, even with the multiple publicity circuit appearances on Entertainment Tonight, the red carpet and elsewhere, only 8% of consumers only trust celebrity endorsements.  Which brings me to the train wreck that is Charlie Sheen. I abstained from talking about this but a friend wrote such a wonderful post about it that I had to transfer the spotlight over to him.

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  • dbinkowski 9:40 pm on February 6, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: chrysler, eminem, Superbowl   

    Chrysler’s “Imported From Detroit” Wins the Superbowl 

    Being a native Detroiter I recognize the obvious bias, but the Chrysler spot with Eminem should make every Detroiter and American feel proud. My only gripe is that they should’ve used it to showcase a more upscale car.

     
  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Old Spice Social Media Buzz Doesn't Equal Sales 

    For the love of God, put your shirt on.

    For the longest time I used to think that PR agencies didn’t get social media. “Give me impressions!” was the public relations mantra because it meant that they could easily transfer their knowledge of publication circulation multipliers into the emerging field called “social media”. Screw the long tail, screw review web sites, screw message boards and all of the other “unimportant” groups online because “they don’t have reach”.

    “We want to take on the ad agencies head on!” was the PR agency rallying cry, and even though most ad agencies are going down the wrong route, and no matter how many decks you presented to them that this gimmick marketing was the wrong approach, they continued to push to ignore the long tail, ignore communities and ignore what actually drives sales. What’s come full circle is that the coveted social media reach play online that ad agencies have been great at have one thing in common: they don’t work.

    (More …)

     
    • quikness 2:31 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was at a roundtable discussion recently where i brought up the report that this campaign hasn't translated into sales and got a pretty good response from one of the other attendees: deodorant or soap isn't something you rush out to buy. You buy it when you run out.If Old Spice can keep this train rolling for another month or two they just might get the sales uptick they're ultimately looking for. And by all accounts, that seems to be what they are trying to do. Its like an all out assault.

    • Marc Meyer 3:23 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe we need to hear from P&G or Wieden. What was the purpose? If it was Buzz only-then it was a home run. If it was to drive sales to a product that still smells the same as it did when my Dad wore it..then we know the answer. Riddle me this, how much of this social blitz was actually about the product?

    • dbinkowski 5:01 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shouldn't the goal always tie back to sales? The rest is just noise and stuff that the trades and award-givers go nuts for.

    • c2cmom 10:48 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, the success should be tied to sales and business impact, and ditto quikness. I disagree that they missed their mark and audience. Old Spice succeeded in resurrecting a tired product to hotness. Hot guy with sense of humor = sexy for millions of wives and girlfriends across the country. While Twitter and YouTube are immediate mediums, the use of deodorant and bodysoap have a slower cycle, and are not purchased on a daily basis, like say, coffee, which could be measured and evaluated within maybe a week. Besides, who purchases deodorant or body soap for most households? 😉 Old Spice at BlogHer makes a lot of sense to buoy the brand and continue the buzz among the women purchasing the wash.Mark, if that's the case, I bet there are millions of 20-something or 30-something year old gals with subliminal memories of the security and manliness of their dads with Old Spice. As right or wrong as that may be . . .;-) On the other hand, that could also be why they weren't focusing on the scent in this campaign to reinvigorate the brand.Either way, when I was on a panel about why and when moms choose to talk about brands and products via social media at the Yahoo! Mother Board Summit last week, as soon as I mentioned the Old Spice campaign, the room of 60 educated and thoughtful women from around the country – many of whom I imagine have disposable income – lit up momentarily. Sharing hubbies and old boyfriends whom used it, laughing about the different videos. Bullseye. Ya know what else? I actually stopped to check it out (price, scent, ingredients) while at CVS for cotton balls today. Not proud. Not ashamed either.

    • Peter Çoopèr 9:21 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah, because all forms of marketing and branding are about selling products within weeks of exposure. Or not. This is a long term game.

    • Soup 9:22 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I bought deodorant today and laughed when I saw the Old Spice. I didn't buy it because I don't like how it smells. Simple as that. Loved the campaign though. Being entertaining doesn't make me want to buy your product unless your product is entertainment.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Motherhood Uncensored 12:56 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      No hot guy on a horse is going to change the fact that it smells like crap. I agree that it was aimed at the wrong crowd. No doubt, it's funny and somewhat entertaining, but would it make me or my husband (who buys his own darn body wash and deo) go out and buy it? No way. They were banking on stats (and maybe rightfully so) that women do all the household buying. So maybe I should be offended that Old Spice thought I'd be so swayed by the sexy man to run out and buy it for mine.I've heard differing numbers on whether this campaign actually did well or not, but overall, I think it did well for brand awareness, but changing what's been ingrained in our heads over the years “Old Spice is for old dudes,” I still think that.

    • dbinkowski 8:54 pm on July 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well, they quickly rushed to the trades to justify their campaign and reported sales were up. However, the fact that the product is also heavily discounted wasn't really mentioned. In a crap economy, cheapest product wins, not “those with the most tweets”.

    • karimkanji 3:14 pm on August 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      You say it was a failure but you use only opinion and not facts. What about the increase in sales that was reported? Would love your thoughts and analysis on this.

      kk

      • dbinkowski 4:56 pm on October 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment! There are two facts that are true:

        1. The brand was heavily discounted during this time period. Social media or not, consumers are looking to save money and a 1/2 price item within a category doesn’t need social media to sell.

        2. The ROI of this campaign has yet to be proven. Yes, there were sales and yes they used social media, however at what cost and what return? Until those factors have been added in it’s way too premature for the agency that created it to be pitching trades on what a huge success this was by simply showing Nielsen data on sales. If the product was a loss leader then it’s not a “win” IMO.

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Old Spice Social Media Buzz Doesn’t Equal Sales 

    For the love of God, put your shirt on.

    For the longest time I used to think that PR agencies didn’t get social media. “Give me impressions!” was the public relations mantra because it meant that they could easily transfer their knowledge of publication circulation multipliers into the emerging field called “social media”. Screw the long tail, screw review web sites, screw message boards and all of the other “unimportant” groups online because “they don’t have reach”.

    “We want to take on the ad agencies head on!” was the PR agency rallying cry, and even though most ad agencies are going down the wrong route, and no matter how many decks you presented to them that this gimmick marketing was the wrong approach, they continued to push to ignore the long tail, ignore communities and ignore what actually drives sales. What’s come full circle is that the coveted social media reach play online that ad agencies have been great at have one thing in common: they don’t work.

    (More …)

     
    • quikness 2:31 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was at a roundtable discussion recently where i brought up the report that this campaign hasn't translated into sales and got a pretty good response from one of the other attendees: deodorant or soap isn't something you rush out to buy. You buy it when you run out.If Old Spice can keep this train rolling for another month or two they just might get the sales uptick they're ultimately looking for. And by all accounts, that seems to be what they are trying to do. Its like an all out assault.

    • Marc Meyer 3:23 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe we need to hear from P&G or Wieden. What was the purpose? If it was Buzz only-then it was a home run. If it was to drive sales to a product that still smells the same as it did when my Dad wore it..then we know the answer. Riddle me this, how much of this social blitz was actually about the product?

    • dbinkowski 5:01 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shouldn't the goal always tie back to sales? The rest is just noise and stuff that the trades and award-givers go nuts for.

    • c2cmom 10:48 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, the success should be tied to sales and business impact, and ditto quikness. I disagree that they missed their mark and audience. Old Spice succeeded in resurrecting a tired product to hotness. Hot guy with sense of humor = sexy for millions of wives and girlfriends across the country. While Twitter and YouTube are immediate mediums, the use of deodorant and bodysoap have a slower cycle, and are not purchased on a daily basis, like say, coffee, which could be measured and evaluated within maybe a week. Besides, who purchases deodorant or body soap for most households? 😉 Old Spice at BlogHer makes a lot of sense to buoy the brand and continue the buzz among the women purchasing the wash.Mark, if that's the case, I bet there are millions of 20-something or 30-something year old gals with subliminal memories of the security and manliness of their dads with Old Spice. As right or wrong as that may be . . .;-) On the other hand, that could also be why they weren't focusing on the scent in this campaign to reinvigorate the brand.Either way, when I was on a panel about why and when moms choose to talk about brands and products via social media at the Yahoo! Mother Board Summit last week, as soon as I mentioned the Old Spice campaign, the room of 60 educated and thoughtful women from around the country – many of whom I imagine have disposable income – lit up momentarily. Sharing hubbies and old boyfriends whom used it, laughing about the different videos. Bullseye. Ya know what else? I actually stopped to check it out (price, scent, ingredients) while at CVS for cotton balls today. Not proud. Not ashamed either.

    • Peter Çoopèr 9:21 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah, because all forms of marketing and branding are about selling products within weeks of exposure. Or not. This is a long term game.

    • Soup 9:22 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I bought deodorant today and laughed when I saw the Old Spice. I didn't buy it because I don't like how it smells. Simple as that. Loved the campaign though. Being entertaining doesn't make me want to buy your product unless your product is entertainment.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Motherhood Uncensored 12:56 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      No hot guy on a horse is going to change the fact that it smells like crap. I agree that it was aimed at the wrong crowd. No doubt, it's funny and somewhat entertaining, but would it make me or my husband (who buys his own darn body wash and deo) go out and buy it? No way. They were banking on stats (and maybe rightfully so) that women do all the household buying. So maybe I should be offended that Old Spice thought I'd be so swayed by the sexy man to run out and buy it for mine.I've heard differing numbers on whether this campaign actually did well or not, but overall, I think it did well for brand awareness, but changing what's been ingrained in our heads over the years “Old Spice is for old dudes,” I still think that.

    • dbinkowski 8:54 pm on July 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well, they quickly rushed to the trades to justify their campaign and reported sales were up. However, the fact that the product is also heavily discounted wasn't really mentioned. In a crap economy, cheapest product wins, not “those with the most tweets”.

    • karimkanji 3:14 pm on August 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      You say it was a failure but you use only opinion and not facts. What about the increase in sales that was reported? Would love your thoughts and analysis on this.

      kk

      • dbinkowski 4:56 pm on October 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment! There are two facts that are true:

        1. The brand was heavily discounted during this time period. Social media or not, consumers are looking to save money and a 1/2 price item within a category doesn’t need social media to sell.

        2. The ROI of this campaign has yet to be proven. Yes, there were sales and yes they used social media, however at what cost and what return? Until those factors have been added in it’s way too premature for the agency that created it to be pitching trades on what a huge success this was by simply showing Nielsen data on sales. If the product was a loss leader then it’s not a “win” IMO.

  • dbinkowski 10:09 am on July 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , influencer project, izea, , , todd and   

    Fast Company’s Influence Project Is A Complete Sham 

    For anyone following this meme on Twitter, Fast Company recently launched a site called “Influence Project”, where they’re essentially pitting online “influencers” against one another to vote for their influencer ranking. The Project is being pushed left and right on Twitter and Facebook and I’m sure elsewhere, but at this point I’ve tuned out from it, not because I don’t want to vote for my friends but because it’s like watching cattle being lined up onto a conveyor belt only to be lead to slaughter.

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    • Jeff Tippett 3:59 pm on July 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Trolling around for posts on the Influencer Project. Thanks for posting.

    • Anna Viele 7:48 pm on July 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was wondering what that was. Makes sense. They will still need content producers, but they won't need people who make a business of showing people who the influnecers are, or how to be influential, or whose business is “influence.”

    • Krista Neher 10:21 pm on July 9, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! Part of the issue is that REAL influencers rise to the top naturally through their actual influence whereas in most of the examples you mention it is more about a popularity contest. The most popular people (or those who can be bothered to harass their friends to vote for them) are not usually actually the most influential.Additionally, many companies who try to leverage influencers totally miss the mark by assuming that “influencers” will pimp their audiences in return for free product. Real influencers have it because they don't do that (and they probably also have better things to do then harass people to vote for them).On a side note, we should launch the Social Media Cool Kids Awards – to enter you have to link to my site 10 times and also drive your friends to my blog to vote. You also have to give me your entire email address book to add to my mailing list. You In? </sarcasm>

    • dbinkowski 4:32 pm on July 10, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Exactly. Most influencers online don't move cases, bottom line. They're good at gaming the system but they are but a sliver of a consumer's overall purchase decision. I think smart marketers know better, though, because even in our space most of the “Top” thinkers don't get any respect; it's typically the unemployed and junior folks helping them maintain their status vs., oh, I dunno, any major brand giving them props for great thinking or work.

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Social Media Spotlight: Brittany "Barefoot Foodie" Gibbons 

    We’re at week three of Social Media Spotlight and this week we’re talking to someone brands may not have heard of, but her 131,000 unique visitors last month should get her some attention. And the good folks at Shamable are about to do just that.

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    • ashley 4:14 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      i.am.addicted. i seriously check the blog like 10 times a day while im at work to see if she posts anything new.totally makes work worth it!

    • Aunt Becky 4:42 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I'm so proud to see a blogger who uses four letter words featured somewhere. I feel like so many of us with great content get sidelined because we're not cookie-cutter bloggers. Content is content and as Britney is evidence of, just because we swear sometimes, doesn't mean people don't read us. On the contrary, because we tell it like it is, people often like us MORE.*ahem*At least, that's allows me to sleep at night.

    • One Mom (Kristina) 4:56 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I started reading Barefoot Foodie about a year ago (a little puzzled by the name since, um, it's not really about food, but I went with it) and it's become a favorite – probably within my top 5. Her writing *is* refreshing and honest and I would have to say it's pretty awesome.

    • dbinkowski 6:25 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      We totally agree. And for those advertisers reading this, I won't disclose the actual numbers but the traffic to Shamable today via just mentioning her and a link from her site has been insane.

    • Justmakingourway 6:44 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I liked hearing Brittany's thoughts on this subject. She is amazingly funny, and I love that she is totally honest. Hopefully, brands will realize that we want to hear more about someone whose life isn't perfect all the time. Lord knows mine isn't – and having some solidarity out there makes blogging all the more fun!

    • Andrea Chamberlain 6:48 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I've wondered about this for awhile now – how do bloggers like Brittany who do not fit into the traditional “mommy blogger” niche, get recognized for their unique voices? If I don't use correct grammar all the time (I don't) and have potty fingers (I do) and drop the occasional “f” bomb on my blog (yep), have I just ruined any and all chances of working with a company who might otherwise have been a perfect fit? Possibly. But if the only way to establish such a relationship is to do so at the expense of my voice and writing style, things I've worked years to develop and which fit me like a well worn glove, then I think I'm happier flying solo. Because really, a world where I'm not free to be myself and start sentences with the word “because” and throw in an exclamation of “for shit's sake, what the hell?” every now and then, is not a place where I want to spend my time.

    • heather... 7:39 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      If I was a brand, I would much rather work with someone who is authentic – someone like Brittany. I am a loyal reader and I pay attention to her voice above everyone else's!

    • Carrie Meadows 7:58 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well said! Brittany's blog is great because of her authenticity. Brands are quick to incorporate risque messages into television marketing, but it seems like they shy away from blogs that post real content, because of language that MIGHT be construed as inappropriate. The fact of the matter is, just like with television and movies, people want you to give it to them straight- no candy-coating.

    • shelly (cookies and cups 12:08 am on June 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Great feature! I love the honest POV she offers…far more authentic that most of whats currently out there!

    • MommyNamedApril 2:59 am on June 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      great interview. i think advertisers are doing themselves a disservice by not finding and using niche blogs with devoted readers like brittany's.

    • Shauna 12:15 pm on June 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I think advertisers are idiots if they don't throw wads of hundred dollar bills at Brittany. Hell, I'd probably make her my bride for sure then. LOVE HER BLOG. LOVE HER.

    • Kmills7271 12:34 pm on June 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Love ya, as always, Brit….Karen

    • Allison Zapata 1:31 am on June 20, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I LOVE me some barefoot foodie! LOVE LOVE LOVE!!

    • Anne Younger 8:46 pm on June 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I ❤ me some Barefoot Foodie!!If I was a brand I would be all over her!She is on my must read list.I always know if I am having a crappy day and need a pick me up I can pick a random post on her site and be laughing my butt off!My husband is addicted to her too!

    • Blogfullyyours 9:14 pm on June 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      As a blogger AND someone who works in advertising I'd have to say this interview is spot on! I am a big Brittany fan and I know there is so much the marketing community has to learn from unique voices like hers. PS – I'm passing this link on to my colleges.

    • Melindat 12:13 am on June 22, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I stumbled upon Brittany by accident a few weeks ago…I have now spent HOURS of my day reading her blogs past and present. I send certain blogs to friends when I think they may find the information useful (like tick removal) or hilarious (her husband trying to kill her with gardening tools)…I can't tell you the number of times I thought “mmmm…..burritos” while reading her blog…proof positive that branding works.

    • Texasholly 12:29 pm on June 22, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I find Brittany refreshing…

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Social Media Spotlight: Brittany “Barefoot Foodie” Gibbons 

    We’re at week three of Social Media Spotlight and this week we’re talking to someone brands may not have heard of, but her 131,000 unique visitors last month should get her some attention. And the good folks at Shamable are about to do just that.

    (More …)

     
    • ashley 4:14 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      i.am.addicted. i seriously check the blog like 10 times a day while im at work to see if she posts anything new.totally makes work worth it!

    • Aunt Becky 4:42 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I'm so proud to see a blogger who uses four letter words featured somewhere. I feel like so many of us with great content get sidelined because we're not cookie-cutter bloggers. Content is content and as Britney is evidence of, just because we swear sometimes, doesn't mean people don't read us. On the contrary, because we tell it like it is, people often like us MORE.*ahem*At least, that's allows me to sleep at night.

    • One Mom (Kristina) 4:56 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I started reading Barefoot Foodie about a year ago (a little puzzled by the name since, um, it's not really about food, but I went with it) and it's become a favorite – probably within my top 5. Her writing *is* refreshing and honest and I would have to say it's pretty awesome.

    • dbinkowski 6:25 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      We totally agree. And for those advertisers reading this, I won't disclose the actual numbers but the traffic to Shamable today via just mentioning her and a link from her site has been insane.

    • Justmakingourway 6:44 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I liked hearing Brittany's thoughts on this subject. She is amazingly funny, and I love that she is totally honest. Hopefully, brands will realize that we want to hear more about someone whose life isn't perfect all the time. Lord knows mine isn't – and having some solidarity out there makes blogging all the more fun!

    • Andrea Chamberlain 6:48 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I've wondered about this for awhile now – how do bloggers like Brittany who do not fit into the traditional “mommy blogger” niche, get recognized for their unique voices? If I don't use correct grammar all the time (I don't) and have potty fingers (I do) and drop the occasional “f” bomb on my blog (yep), have I just ruined any and all chances of working with a company who might otherwise have been a perfect fit? Possibly. But if the only way to establish such a relationship is to do so at the expense of my voice and writing style, things I've worked years to develop and which fit me like a well worn glove, then I think I'm happier flying solo. Because really, a world where I'm not free to be myself and start sentences with the word “because” and throw in an exclamation of “for shit's sake, what the hell?” every now and then, is not a place where I want to spend my time.

    • heather... 7:39 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      If I was a brand, I would much rather work with someone who is authentic – someone like Brittany. I am a loyal reader and I pay attention to her voice above everyone else's!

    • Carrie Meadows 7:58 pm on June 18, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well said! Brittany's blog is great because of her authenticity. Brands are quick to incorporate risque messages into television marketing, but it seems like they shy away from blogs that post real content, because of language that MIGHT be construed as inappropriate. The fact of the matter is, just like with television and movies, people want you to give it to them straight- no candy-coating.

    • shelly (cookies and cups 12:08 am on June 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Great feature! I love the honest POV she offers…far more authentic that most of whats currently out there!

    • MommyNamedApril 2:59 am on June 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      great interview. i think advertisers are doing themselves a disservice by not finding and using niche blogs with devoted readers like brittany's.

    • Shauna 12:15 pm on June 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I think advertisers are idiots if they don't throw wads of hundred dollar bills at Brittany. Hell, I'd probably make her my bride for sure then. LOVE HER BLOG. LOVE HER.

    • Kmills7271 12:34 pm on June 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Love ya, as always, Brit….Karen

    • Allison Zapata 1:31 am on June 20, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I LOVE me some barefoot foodie! LOVE LOVE LOVE!!

    • Anne Younger 8:46 pm on June 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I ❤ me some Barefoot Foodie!!If I was a brand I would be all over her!She is on my must read list.I always know if I am having a crappy day and need a pick me up I can pick a random post on her site and be laughing my butt off!My husband is addicted to her too!

    • Blogfullyyours 9:14 pm on June 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      As a blogger AND someone who works in advertising I'd have to say this interview is spot on! I am a big Brittany fan and I know there is so much the marketing community has to learn from unique voices like hers. PS – I'm passing this link on to my colleges.

    • Melindat 12:13 am on June 22, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I stumbled upon Brittany by accident a few weeks ago…I have now spent HOURS of my day reading her blogs past and present. I send certain blogs to friends when I think they may find the information useful (like tick removal) or hilarious (her husband trying to kill her with gardening tools)…I can't tell you the number of times I thought “mmmm…..burritos” while reading her blog…proof positive that branding works.

    • Texasholly 12:29 pm on June 22, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I find Brittany refreshing…

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on June 4, 2010 Permalink
    Tags: blogger spotlight, heather spohr, the spohrs are multiplying   

    Blogger Spotlight: Heather Spohr 

    Earlier this week I wrote a post about working with bloggers and how brands can find the right one. The Shamable team thought it would be a great idea to start highlighting bloggers from different verticals each week so marketers can meet some of the faces behind the names. This week we’re talking with Heather Spohr from The Spohrs Are Multiplying.

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    • Anna Viele 1:57 pm on June 4, 2010 Permalink

      Nice interview. Impeccable taste in blogs.

    • dbinkowski 2:07 pm on June 4, 2010 Permalink

      I concur!

    • A Whole Lot of Nothing 2:07 pm on June 4, 2010 Permalink

      Heck of a gal, I say. HECK. of. a. gal.

    • amandamagee 2:10 pm on June 4, 2010 Permalink

      I have such a crush on Heather! Beautiful choice.

    • TheNextMartha 3:01 am on June 5, 2010 Permalink

      Who doesn't love Heather? No one. Do you know no one? Me either.

    • dbinkowski 4:12 am on June 5, 2010 Permalink

      Thanks! I'm a big fan and was fortunate enough to meet her in person last year at a conference. 🙂

    • brittany 1:41 pm on June 5, 2010 Permalink

      As do I! Huge fan!

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on June 3, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , clients   

    Five Agencies Brands Should Avoid 

    Yesterday I posted a piece on matchmaking between bloggers and brands that seemed to go over pretty well. Today’s focus is going to shift to the relationship between a brand and their agency. In particular, there seem to be a few tried and true ways of weeding out those who’ll constantly disappoint or, at the very least, annoy the hell out of you.

    (More …)

     
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