Updates from May, 2011 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • dbinkowski 9:56 am on May 3, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: promosexuals   

    5 Signs You’re Dealing With A Social Media PromoSexual 

    “You talking loud, but you ain’t saying nuthin…” – The Fugees

    A single, former co-worker, Dad friend of mine posted a link on Facebook the other day that caught my attention and at first I thought it was about Social Media Celebrities. The blog post was really about the single urban professionals who on the surface are into being in a relationship but realistically they really aren’t interested in being involved at all; while I can’t directly relate to this dating phenomenon, I can say that I see similar behavior online from the Promosexuals in the social media industry – on the surface you think “Wow, they must touch a lot of client business” when in reality they have no agenda other than promoting themselves. Here are the sure-tell signs that you’re dealing with a promosexual.

    (More …)

     
  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    A Dad’s Guide to Water Parks 

    Ah, Summer. A time when a man can sweat like a man, when the stench of a good cigar can linger in your pores for days and when the A/C gets cranked on “high” for three months straight. For those of us without a pool (forget the oceans, they’re so polluted you can’t even catch and eat fish from ’em) it’s a time when we think about who we know that owns a pool, how we might get access to said pool, and potentially investing in a $20,000 hole in the ground in exchange for no one wanting to buy said investment when it’s time to sell the house. And then there’s one of Ricky Bobby’s reasons people come to America: giant water parks.

    (More …)

     
    • Mrs. Call Me Crazy 1:37 am on July 31, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The pee thing is so true! And also, I feel skinny at the water park. The water park near our house (in Sandusky, OH) might as well be a Wal-Mart with bathing suit clad patrons. These bitches are HUGE.

    • dbinkowski 10:28 pm on August 1, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      is it Cedar Pointe by chance?

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    A Dad's Guide to Water Parks 

    Ah, Summer. A time when a man can sweat like a man, when the stench of a good cigar can linger in your pores for days and when the A/C gets cranked on “high” for three months straight. For those of us without a pool (forget the oceans, they’re so polluted you can’t even catch and eat fish from ’em) it’s a time when we think about who we know that owns a pool, how we might get access to said pool, and potentially investing in a $20,000 hole in the ground in exchange for no one wanting to buy said investment when it’s time to sell the house. And then there’s one of Ricky Bobby’s reasons people come to America: giant water parks.

    (More …)

     
    • Mrs. Call Me Crazy 1:37 am on July 31, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The pee thing is so true! And also, I feel skinny at the water park. The water park near our house (in Sandusky, OH) might as well be a Wal-Mart with bathing suit clad patrons. These bitches are HUGE.

    • dbinkowski 10:28 pm on August 1, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      is it Cedar Pointe by chance?

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Old Spice Social Media Buzz Doesn’t Equal Sales 

    For the love of God, put your shirt on.

    For the longest time I used to think that PR agencies didn’t get social media. “Give me impressions!” was the public relations mantra because it meant that they could easily transfer their knowledge of publication circulation multipliers into the emerging field called “social media”. Screw the long tail, screw review web sites, screw message boards and all of the other “unimportant” groups online because “they don’t have reach”.

    “We want to take on the ad agencies head on!” was the PR agency rallying cry, and even though most ad agencies are going down the wrong route, and no matter how many decks you presented to them that this gimmick marketing was the wrong approach, they continued to push to ignore the long tail, ignore communities and ignore what actually drives sales. What’s come full circle is that the coveted social media reach play online that ad agencies have been great at have one thing in common: they don’t work.

    (More …)

     
    • quikness 2:31 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was at a roundtable discussion recently where i brought up the report that this campaign hasn't translated into sales and got a pretty good response from one of the other attendees: deodorant or soap isn't something you rush out to buy. You buy it when you run out.If Old Spice can keep this train rolling for another month or two they just might get the sales uptick they're ultimately looking for. And by all accounts, that seems to be what they are trying to do. Its like an all out assault.

    • Marc Meyer 3:23 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe we need to hear from P&G or Wieden. What was the purpose? If it was Buzz only-then it was a home run. If it was to drive sales to a product that still smells the same as it did when my Dad wore it..then we know the answer. Riddle me this, how much of this social blitz was actually about the product?

    • dbinkowski 5:01 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shouldn't the goal always tie back to sales? The rest is just noise and stuff that the trades and award-givers go nuts for.

    • c2cmom 10:48 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, the success should be tied to sales and business impact, and ditto quikness. I disagree that they missed their mark and audience. Old Spice succeeded in resurrecting a tired product to hotness. Hot guy with sense of humor = sexy for millions of wives and girlfriends across the country. While Twitter and YouTube are immediate mediums, the use of deodorant and bodysoap have a slower cycle, and are not purchased on a daily basis, like say, coffee, which could be measured and evaluated within maybe a week. Besides, who purchases deodorant or body soap for most households? 😉 Old Spice at BlogHer makes a lot of sense to buoy the brand and continue the buzz among the women purchasing the wash.Mark, if that's the case, I bet there are millions of 20-something or 30-something year old gals with subliminal memories of the security and manliness of their dads with Old Spice. As right or wrong as that may be . . .;-) On the other hand, that could also be why they weren't focusing on the scent in this campaign to reinvigorate the brand.Either way, when I was on a panel about why and when moms choose to talk about brands and products via social media at the Yahoo! Mother Board Summit last week, as soon as I mentioned the Old Spice campaign, the room of 60 educated and thoughtful women from around the country – many of whom I imagine have disposable income – lit up momentarily. Sharing hubbies and old boyfriends whom used it, laughing about the different videos. Bullseye. Ya know what else? I actually stopped to check it out (price, scent, ingredients) while at CVS for cotton balls today. Not proud. Not ashamed either.

    • Peter Çoopèr 9:21 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah, because all forms of marketing and branding are about selling products within weeks of exposure. Or not. This is a long term game.

    • Soup 9:22 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I bought deodorant today and laughed when I saw the Old Spice. I didn't buy it because I don't like how it smells. Simple as that. Loved the campaign though. Being entertaining doesn't make me want to buy your product unless your product is entertainment.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Motherhood Uncensored 12:56 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      No hot guy on a horse is going to change the fact that it smells like crap. I agree that it was aimed at the wrong crowd. No doubt, it's funny and somewhat entertaining, but would it make me or my husband (who buys his own darn body wash and deo) go out and buy it? No way. They were banking on stats (and maybe rightfully so) that women do all the household buying. So maybe I should be offended that Old Spice thought I'd be so swayed by the sexy man to run out and buy it for mine.I've heard differing numbers on whether this campaign actually did well or not, but overall, I think it did well for brand awareness, but changing what's been ingrained in our heads over the years “Old Spice is for old dudes,” I still think that.

    • dbinkowski 8:54 pm on July 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well, they quickly rushed to the trades to justify their campaign and reported sales were up. However, the fact that the product is also heavily discounted wasn't really mentioned. In a crap economy, cheapest product wins, not “those with the most tweets”.

    • karimkanji 3:14 pm on August 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      You say it was a failure but you use only opinion and not facts. What about the increase in sales that was reported? Would love your thoughts and analysis on this.

      kk

      • dbinkowski 4:56 pm on October 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment! There are two facts that are true:

        1. The brand was heavily discounted during this time period. Social media or not, consumers are looking to save money and a 1/2 price item within a category doesn’t need social media to sell.

        2. The ROI of this campaign has yet to be proven. Yes, there were sales and yes they used social media, however at what cost and what return? Until those factors have been added in it’s way too premature for the agency that created it to be pitching trades on what a huge success this was by simply showing Nielsen data on sales. If the product was a loss leader then it’s not a “win” IMO.

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Old Spice Social Media Buzz Doesn't Equal Sales 

    For the love of God, put your shirt on.

    For the longest time I used to think that PR agencies didn’t get social media. “Give me impressions!” was the public relations mantra because it meant that they could easily transfer their knowledge of publication circulation multipliers into the emerging field called “social media”. Screw the long tail, screw review web sites, screw message boards and all of the other “unimportant” groups online because “they don’t have reach”.

    “We want to take on the ad agencies head on!” was the PR agency rallying cry, and even though most ad agencies are going down the wrong route, and no matter how many decks you presented to them that this gimmick marketing was the wrong approach, they continued to push to ignore the long tail, ignore communities and ignore what actually drives sales. What’s come full circle is that the coveted social media reach play online that ad agencies have been great at have one thing in common: they don’t work.

    (More …)

     
    • quikness 2:31 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was at a roundtable discussion recently where i brought up the report that this campaign hasn't translated into sales and got a pretty good response from one of the other attendees: deodorant or soap isn't something you rush out to buy. You buy it when you run out.If Old Spice can keep this train rolling for another month or two they just might get the sales uptick they're ultimately looking for. And by all accounts, that seems to be what they are trying to do. Its like an all out assault.

    • Marc Meyer 3:23 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe we need to hear from P&G or Wieden. What was the purpose? If it was Buzz only-then it was a home run. If it was to drive sales to a product that still smells the same as it did when my Dad wore it..then we know the answer. Riddle me this, how much of this social blitz was actually about the product?

    • dbinkowski 5:01 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shouldn't the goal always tie back to sales? The rest is just noise and stuff that the trades and award-givers go nuts for.

    • c2cmom 10:48 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, the success should be tied to sales and business impact, and ditto quikness. I disagree that they missed their mark and audience. Old Spice succeeded in resurrecting a tired product to hotness. Hot guy with sense of humor = sexy for millions of wives and girlfriends across the country. While Twitter and YouTube are immediate mediums, the use of deodorant and bodysoap have a slower cycle, and are not purchased on a daily basis, like say, coffee, which could be measured and evaluated within maybe a week. Besides, who purchases deodorant or body soap for most households? 😉 Old Spice at BlogHer makes a lot of sense to buoy the brand and continue the buzz among the women purchasing the wash.Mark, if that's the case, I bet there are millions of 20-something or 30-something year old gals with subliminal memories of the security and manliness of their dads with Old Spice. As right or wrong as that may be . . .;-) On the other hand, that could also be why they weren't focusing on the scent in this campaign to reinvigorate the brand.Either way, when I was on a panel about why and when moms choose to talk about brands and products via social media at the Yahoo! Mother Board Summit last week, as soon as I mentioned the Old Spice campaign, the room of 60 educated and thoughtful women from around the country – many of whom I imagine have disposable income – lit up momentarily. Sharing hubbies and old boyfriends whom used it, laughing about the different videos. Bullseye. Ya know what else? I actually stopped to check it out (price, scent, ingredients) while at CVS for cotton balls today. Not proud. Not ashamed either.

    • Peter Çoopèr 9:21 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah, because all forms of marketing and branding are about selling products within weeks of exposure. Or not. This is a long term game.

    • Soup 9:22 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I bought deodorant today and laughed when I saw the Old Spice. I didn't buy it because I don't like how it smells. Simple as that. Loved the campaign though. Being entertaining doesn't make me want to buy your product unless your product is entertainment.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Motherhood Uncensored 12:56 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      No hot guy on a horse is going to change the fact that it smells like crap. I agree that it was aimed at the wrong crowd. No doubt, it's funny and somewhat entertaining, but would it make me or my husband (who buys his own darn body wash and deo) go out and buy it? No way. They were banking on stats (and maybe rightfully so) that women do all the household buying. So maybe I should be offended that Old Spice thought I'd be so swayed by the sexy man to run out and buy it for mine.I've heard differing numbers on whether this campaign actually did well or not, but overall, I think it did well for brand awareness, but changing what's been ingrained in our heads over the years “Old Spice is for old dudes,” I still think that.

    • dbinkowski 8:54 pm on July 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well, they quickly rushed to the trades to justify their campaign and reported sales were up. However, the fact that the product is also heavily discounted wasn't really mentioned. In a crap economy, cheapest product wins, not “those with the most tweets”.

    • karimkanji 3:14 pm on August 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      You say it was a failure but you use only opinion and not facts. What about the increase in sales that was reported? Would love your thoughts and analysis on this.

      kk

      • dbinkowski 4:56 pm on October 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment! There are two facts that are true:

        1. The brand was heavily discounted during this time period. Social media or not, consumers are looking to save money and a 1/2 price item within a category doesn’t need social media to sell.

        2. The ROI of this campaign has yet to be proven. Yes, there were sales and yes they used social media, however at what cost and what return? Until those factors have been added in it’s way too premature for the agency that created it to be pitching trades on what a huge success this was by simply showing Nielsen data on sales. If the product was a loss leader then it’s not a “win” IMO.

  • dbinkowski 9:35 am on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: .co, domain names, domain registrars   

    Inc.com Grasping at Straws on .co Domains 

    For those who may’ve missed it, a new top level domain (TLD) was released yesterday called “.co”. Surprisingly Inc.com, a site and magazine I respect, went with a blog post advising readers to “run, don’t walk” to buy your .co domain today. Don’t fall for it, this is yet another domain registrar ploy and is a waste of your business’s money. Here’s why…

    (More …)

     
    • A Whole Lot of Nothing 1:50 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Just like everything else in the internet world, they are trends. Now, I'm off to buy a .xxx domain for my family's website just for funsies.

    • Dave Saunders 2:28 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Perhaps I reading something extra into your text, but I don't recall .org and .net being created as part of a scare tactic. Those top level domains were included in the proposed domain hierarchy of RFC 1032, written in 1987. In the mid to late 90s people started to register their businesses and trademarks under multiple top level domains in direct response to cybersquatters who were deliberately and willfully violating those trademarks. I don't recall it being a scare tactic with the domain services as much as a response to what was happening around us at the time. I agree with you that the “sky is falling” approach to registering with every top level domain is not entirely useful. Where is the line and how do you choose which top levels not to register for? Stop the insanity, right?I think there may be legal and fiduciary questions which transcend whether or not it seems like a necessity. I've been told by IP Lawyers that ignoring opportunities to protect your copyrights and trademarks weakens your protection when you find yourself actually fighting for it. If you're the owner of a business, does it make sense to not pay $10 to register a top level domain that at least suggests itself to play in your space?

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    It’s Time to Kill the Dress Shirt Pocket 

    I used to work in retail and have always been pretty observant of fashion trends. I don’t always follow them (see: Parachute pants, Skidz and skinny jeans) because well, just because they’re at Fashion Week doesn’t mean it looks good on most people or should be worn outside of a runway show. But there are some fashions that have made the mainstream that just need to go away, especially for men. I’m, of course, referring to dress shirt pockets.

    (More …)

     
    • COD 1:51 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      This post is not relevant to my interests. I wear a dress shirt about twice a month.

    • dbinkowski 2:08 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Ok fine, my next post will be about horses and tech. 😉

    • Brittany 2:21 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      ZOMG I love man rallying cries!Hmmm….trying to think if I have caught you in skinny jeans??*thinky face*Listen, the pockets are hot. For real, totally not douchey at all. Adds flair. plus, fat guys need them to camouflage their boobs a bit. Maybe if you bring back the ascot? You can't have shirts with chest pockets if you are wearing an ascot, it's just too busy. Everyone knows that.

    • A Whole Lot of Nothing 2:38 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Can pleated pants go out with the chest-pocked shirt?

    • Vinny 2:44 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shirt pockets do not camouflage moobs. At all. In fact, they make it worse because over time, the top of the pocket pulls away from the shirt itself making the moobs even more poofy.Trust me. 😉

    • LissieC 6:22 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thank GOD you dont wear skinny jeans. I like to point and laugh at men who wear skinny jeans.What you are describing is not a dress shirt however. Its a casual button down, and pockets are ok for them.

    • LiteralDan 2:43 pm on July 22, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      But where else am I going to keep my decorative handkerchief?? Or my fancy pens I need everyone to know I own??No one will see them in my pants pockets!

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    It's Time to Kill the Dress Shirt Pocket 

    I used to work in retail and have always been pretty observant of fashion trends. I don’t always follow them (see: Parachute pants, Skidz and skinny jeans) because well, just because they’re at Fashion Week doesn’t mean it looks good on most people or should be worn outside of a runway show. But there are some fashions that have made the mainstream that just need to go away, especially for men. I’m, of course, referring to dress shirt pockets.

    (More …)

     
    • COD 1:51 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      This post is not relevant to my interests. I wear a dress shirt about twice a month.

    • dbinkowski 2:08 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Ok fine, my next post will be about horses and tech. 😉

    • Brittany 2:21 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      ZOMG I love man rallying cries!Hmmm….trying to think if I have caught you in skinny jeans??*thinky face*Listen, the pockets are hot. For real, totally not douchey at all. Adds flair. plus, fat guys need them to camouflage their boobs a bit. Maybe if you bring back the ascot? You can't have shirts with chest pockets if you are wearing an ascot, it's just too busy. Everyone knows that.

    • A Whole Lot of Nothing 2:38 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Can pleated pants go out with the chest-pocked shirt?

    • Vinny 2:44 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shirt pockets do not camouflage moobs. At all. In fact, they make it worse because over time, the top of the pocket pulls away from the shirt itself making the moobs even more poofy.Trust me. 😉

    • LissieC 6:22 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thank GOD you dont wear skinny jeans. I like to point and laugh at men who wear skinny jeans.What you are describing is not a dress shirt however. Its a casual button down, and pockets are ok for them.

    • LiteralDan 2:43 pm on July 22, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      But where else am I going to keep my decorative handkerchief?? Or my fancy pens I need everyone to know I own??No one will see them in my pants pockets!

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , florida gators, tim tebow,   

    EA Sports NCAA 11 Football Review 

    image from Gamestop.com

    This is undoubtedly going to be part one of my reviews of EA Sports’s NCAA 11 Football for the XBox. I got the game on Friday night for my birthday and have had about 6 hours played on it thus far (hey, busy dads have things to do!) and will continue to build on this review as I explore more features, functions and options added to this year’s edition. Yes, there are that many changes to cover and rather than half-ass it I’ll go through them in a methodical, timely manner. So, onto my review:

    (More …)

     
  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: food, high fructose corn syrup, inc, king corn, stoneyfield farms, wal-mart   

    I Used to Sneer At Food Made by Cat People 

    I can haz your catz fur in mah fud? (Alternate title: Not exactly what I had in mind when I said I wanted to eat pussy.)

    As a card carrying member of the Man Club, there are very few foods I wouldn’t stuff my face with – especially after having a few drinks. Day old burritos? No problem. Week-old General Tsao’s chicken? Just pick off the hardened rice and we’re good to go. Half-brown pears? Why not, they’re just as juicy and I don’t have to work as hard to eat ‘em.

    At one point I noticed something, though. A co-worker and avid cat lover admitted that she let her cat sleep in her sink, on the counters and occasionally in a bowl. Yes, her cat’s filthy paws, that had just been in a litter box, were now in the place where the cookies for the company outing were prepared. A charming woman, I made a point to ask which dish she brought to pot lucks and never touch it.

    (More …)

     
    • COD 2:25 pm on July 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Nice post David.

    • dbinkowski 2:40 am on July 9, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Chris! I figured you'd enjoy it 🙂

    • Loxly a.k.a Deborah 2:48 am on July 9, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David, this is a great article. It started out funny and because I am one of those “cat people” I was intrigued by your title. It turned out to be a very informative article that I hope people will take seriously.

    • dbinkowski 10:39 pm on August 1, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      thanks Deb. it's a huge problem and if they want to tackle the obesity epidemic they'll take on the food companies… given how the government functions my guess is that they probably won't. it's actually quite scary if you think about the notion that the poor are kept “at bay' due to cheap food; the widening income gap and health issues can't sustain forever before there's a mutiny.

    • Sanjeetshandilya 7:14 am on August 18, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      this image is very beautiful

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel