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  • dbinkowski 11:08 am on September 24, 2011 Permalink | Reply  

    Facebook’s Changes Means Digital Agencies Should Thrive 

    Thursday the bomb was dropped at f8 that Facebook is going to be ditching the Like in favor of user actions and passive updates, meaning that when you engage with apps and have the “Add to Timeline” feature enabled it will automatically update your Timeline with what you’re doing (for an example of this, check out the Washington Post Social app). It’s mildly reminiscent of the auto-checkin app for Foursquare, and of course the “please rob me” site that followed, however this latest change is not only a strong push for brands to do more on Facebook than create pithy status updates to get noticed, but should be a huge wake up call for the marketing industry as to where the budgets will be going.

    (More …)

     
  • dbinkowski 6:10 pm on August 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: astroturfing, itunes, reverb communications   

    Reverb Communications Busted By The FTC For Astroturfing 

    Last year TechCrunch outed PR firm Reverb Communications for astroturfing in the iTunes app store on behalf of their clients. As it turns out, the FTC took notice and recent revealed that they settled with the firm that posted misleading reviews of their clients products. As someone that’s been intimately involved with the Word of Mouth Marketing Association and drafted our Association’s FTC guidelines,  my question is: Why not go after the app makers too? (More …)

     
  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Old Spice Social Media Buzz Doesn't Equal Sales 

    For the love of God, put your shirt on.

    For the longest time I used to think that PR agencies didn’t get social media. “Give me impressions!” was the public relations mantra because it meant that they could easily transfer their knowledge of publication circulation multipliers into the emerging field called “social media”. Screw the long tail, screw review web sites, screw message boards and all of the other “unimportant” groups online because “they don’t have reach”.

    “We want to take on the ad agencies head on!” was the PR agency rallying cry, and even though most ad agencies are going down the wrong route, and no matter how many decks you presented to them that this gimmick marketing was the wrong approach, they continued to push to ignore the long tail, ignore communities and ignore what actually drives sales. What’s come full circle is that the coveted social media reach play online that ad agencies have been great at have one thing in common: they don’t work.

    (More …)

     
    • quikness 2:31 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was at a roundtable discussion recently where i brought up the report that this campaign hasn't translated into sales and got a pretty good response from one of the other attendees: deodorant or soap isn't something you rush out to buy. You buy it when you run out.If Old Spice can keep this train rolling for another month or two they just might get the sales uptick they're ultimately looking for. And by all accounts, that seems to be what they are trying to do. Its like an all out assault.

    • Marc Meyer 3:23 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe we need to hear from P&G or Wieden. What was the purpose? If it was Buzz only-then it was a home run. If it was to drive sales to a product that still smells the same as it did when my Dad wore it..then we know the answer. Riddle me this, how much of this social blitz was actually about the product?

    • dbinkowski 5:01 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shouldn't the goal always tie back to sales? The rest is just noise and stuff that the trades and award-givers go nuts for.

    • c2cmom 10:48 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, the success should be tied to sales and business impact, and ditto quikness. I disagree that they missed their mark and audience. Old Spice succeeded in resurrecting a tired product to hotness. Hot guy with sense of humor = sexy for millions of wives and girlfriends across the country. While Twitter and YouTube are immediate mediums, the use of deodorant and bodysoap have a slower cycle, and are not purchased on a daily basis, like say, coffee, which could be measured and evaluated within maybe a week. Besides, who purchases deodorant or body soap for most households? 😉 Old Spice at BlogHer makes a lot of sense to buoy the brand and continue the buzz among the women purchasing the wash.Mark, if that's the case, I bet there are millions of 20-something or 30-something year old gals with subliminal memories of the security and manliness of their dads with Old Spice. As right or wrong as that may be . . .;-) On the other hand, that could also be why they weren't focusing on the scent in this campaign to reinvigorate the brand.Either way, when I was on a panel about why and when moms choose to talk about brands and products via social media at the Yahoo! Mother Board Summit last week, as soon as I mentioned the Old Spice campaign, the room of 60 educated and thoughtful women from around the country – many of whom I imagine have disposable income – lit up momentarily. Sharing hubbies and old boyfriends whom used it, laughing about the different videos. Bullseye. Ya know what else? I actually stopped to check it out (price, scent, ingredients) while at CVS for cotton balls today. Not proud. Not ashamed either.

    • Peter Çoopèr 9:21 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah, because all forms of marketing and branding are about selling products within weeks of exposure. Or not. This is a long term game.

    • Soup 9:22 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I bought deodorant today and laughed when I saw the Old Spice. I didn't buy it because I don't like how it smells. Simple as that. Loved the campaign though. Being entertaining doesn't make me want to buy your product unless your product is entertainment.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Motherhood Uncensored 12:56 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      No hot guy on a horse is going to change the fact that it smells like crap. I agree that it was aimed at the wrong crowd. No doubt, it's funny and somewhat entertaining, but would it make me or my husband (who buys his own darn body wash and deo) go out and buy it? No way. They were banking on stats (and maybe rightfully so) that women do all the household buying. So maybe I should be offended that Old Spice thought I'd be so swayed by the sexy man to run out and buy it for mine.I've heard differing numbers on whether this campaign actually did well or not, but overall, I think it did well for brand awareness, but changing what's been ingrained in our heads over the years “Old Spice is for old dudes,” I still think that.

    • dbinkowski 8:54 pm on July 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well, they quickly rushed to the trades to justify their campaign and reported sales were up. However, the fact that the product is also heavily discounted wasn't really mentioned. In a crap economy, cheapest product wins, not “those with the most tweets”.

    • karimkanji 3:14 pm on August 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      You say it was a failure but you use only opinion and not facts. What about the increase in sales that was reported? Would love your thoughts and analysis on this.

      kk

      • dbinkowski 4:56 pm on October 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment! There are two facts that are true:

        1. The brand was heavily discounted during this time period. Social media or not, consumers are looking to save money and a 1/2 price item within a category doesn’t need social media to sell.

        2. The ROI of this campaign has yet to be proven. Yes, there were sales and yes they used social media, however at what cost and what return? Until those factors have been added in it’s way too premature for the agency that created it to be pitching trades on what a huge success this was by simply showing Nielsen data on sales. If the product was a loss leader then it’s not a “win” IMO.

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Old Spice Social Media Buzz Doesn’t Equal Sales 

    For the love of God, put your shirt on.

    For the longest time I used to think that PR agencies didn’t get social media. “Give me impressions!” was the public relations mantra because it meant that they could easily transfer their knowledge of publication circulation multipliers into the emerging field called “social media”. Screw the long tail, screw review web sites, screw message boards and all of the other “unimportant” groups online because “they don’t have reach”.

    “We want to take on the ad agencies head on!” was the PR agency rallying cry, and even though most ad agencies are going down the wrong route, and no matter how many decks you presented to them that this gimmick marketing was the wrong approach, they continued to push to ignore the long tail, ignore communities and ignore what actually drives sales. What’s come full circle is that the coveted social media reach play online that ad agencies have been great at have one thing in common: they don’t work.

    (More …)

     
    • quikness 2:31 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was at a roundtable discussion recently where i brought up the report that this campaign hasn't translated into sales and got a pretty good response from one of the other attendees: deodorant or soap isn't something you rush out to buy. You buy it when you run out.If Old Spice can keep this train rolling for another month or two they just might get the sales uptick they're ultimately looking for. And by all accounts, that seems to be what they are trying to do. Its like an all out assault.

    • Marc Meyer 3:23 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe we need to hear from P&G or Wieden. What was the purpose? If it was Buzz only-then it was a home run. If it was to drive sales to a product that still smells the same as it did when my Dad wore it..then we know the answer. Riddle me this, how much of this social blitz was actually about the product?

    • dbinkowski 5:01 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shouldn't the goal always tie back to sales? The rest is just noise and stuff that the trades and award-givers go nuts for.

    • c2cmom 10:48 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, the success should be tied to sales and business impact, and ditto quikness. I disagree that they missed their mark and audience. Old Spice succeeded in resurrecting a tired product to hotness. Hot guy with sense of humor = sexy for millions of wives and girlfriends across the country. While Twitter and YouTube are immediate mediums, the use of deodorant and bodysoap have a slower cycle, and are not purchased on a daily basis, like say, coffee, which could be measured and evaluated within maybe a week. Besides, who purchases deodorant or body soap for most households? 😉 Old Spice at BlogHer makes a lot of sense to buoy the brand and continue the buzz among the women purchasing the wash.Mark, if that's the case, I bet there are millions of 20-something or 30-something year old gals with subliminal memories of the security and manliness of their dads with Old Spice. As right or wrong as that may be . . .;-) On the other hand, that could also be why they weren't focusing on the scent in this campaign to reinvigorate the brand.Either way, when I was on a panel about why and when moms choose to talk about brands and products via social media at the Yahoo! Mother Board Summit last week, as soon as I mentioned the Old Spice campaign, the room of 60 educated and thoughtful women from around the country – many of whom I imagine have disposable income – lit up momentarily. Sharing hubbies and old boyfriends whom used it, laughing about the different videos. Bullseye. Ya know what else? I actually stopped to check it out (price, scent, ingredients) while at CVS for cotton balls today. Not proud. Not ashamed either.

    • Peter Çoopèr 9:21 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah, because all forms of marketing and branding are about selling products within weeks of exposure. Or not. This is a long term game.

    • Soup 9:22 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I bought deodorant today and laughed when I saw the Old Spice. I didn't buy it because I don't like how it smells. Simple as that. Loved the campaign though. Being entertaining doesn't make me want to buy your product unless your product is entertainment.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Motherhood Uncensored 12:56 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      No hot guy on a horse is going to change the fact that it smells like crap. I agree that it was aimed at the wrong crowd. No doubt, it's funny and somewhat entertaining, but would it make me or my husband (who buys his own darn body wash and deo) go out and buy it? No way. They were banking on stats (and maybe rightfully so) that women do all the household buying. So maybe I should be offended that Old Spice thought I'd be so swayed by the sexy man to run out and buy it for mine.I've heard differing numbers on whether this campaign actually did well or not, but overall, I think it did well for brand awareness, but changing what's been ingrained in our heads over the years “Old Spice is for old dudes,” I still think that.

    • dbinkowski 8:54 pm on July 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well, they quickly rushed to the trades to justify their campaign and reported sales were up. However, the fact that the product is also heavily discounted wasn't really mentioned. In a crap economy, cheapest product wins, not “those with the most tweets”.

    • karimkanji 3:14 pm on August 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      You say it was a failure but you use only opinion and not facts. What about the increase in sales that was reported? Would love your thoughts and analysis on this.

      kk

      • dbinkowski 4:56 pm on October 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment! There are two facts that are true:

        1. The brand was heavily discounted during this time period. Social media or not, consumers are looking to save money and a 1/2 price item within a category doesn’t need social media to sell.

        2. The ROI of this campaign has yet to be proven. Yes, there were sales and yes they used social media, however at what cost and what return? Until those factors have been added in it’s way too premature for the agency that created it to be pitching trades on what a huge success this was by simply showing Nielsen data on sales. If the product was a loss leader then it’s not a “win” IMO.

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    It's Time for Me to Zag 

    Wayne Gretzky has one of the greatest sayings of all time that has stuck with me since I heard it several years ago. When asked what the difference between a good hockey player and a great hockey player was, he said, “A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be.”

    I’m not comparing myself to the Great One by any stretch of the imagination. However, if you’ve read my blog posts and pay attention to the agency world – and most important, listen to your clients – you know the business is changing fast. A few companies are growing larger and larger while others are starting up, shifting focus or being bought. The lines between advertising, PR and digital agencies has been blurred so badly that it’s difficult to really tell what their differentiation really is. The PR firm has hired digital teams, the ad agencies now have PR folks and the digital shops, well, they claim to be able to do everything the other two can do but better. Which totally makes sense given their long time lines, production-shop mentality and outsourcing. Oh wait — it doesn’t.

    I still think PR has the leg up because of their ability to respond quickly with messaging, something the other shops will only see as a “bolt on” solution for clients. “Make this ad (or website) ‘PR-able!'” is a request I’ve heard all too many times from the large players, who are raking in millions of dollars for creative, only to watch it fall flat because the smart sounding British dudes in funky glasses oversold the impact their widget would have. “EVERYONE WILL BE DOWNLOADING YOUR WIDGET!” they’d say. The whole thing has clients heads spinning and this is before you even factor in social media-specific shops, also known as the dodo bird of the agency world.

    Back to large agencies for a second: In certain instances, it makes a lot of sense for a multinational business that spans many continents to hire a large agency because they need the scale and as such can negotiate competitive rates. This makes procurement happy because it’s one contract with one holding company and theoretically they’re saving a few bucks. I’ve yet to see this model work flawlessly as typically campaigns are customized and executed differently in local markets, but I digress.

    Conversely, there are companies (and marketers) looking to smaller firms that can be nimble, provide senior level thinking and attention on a regular basis to help guide them through the ever changing business and marketing landscape while providing the creativity and speed that their multinational counterparts can’t offer.  I truly believe the agency world is changing and that while for the past several years I’ve worked at the former, it’s time to go where the puck is going. It’s with that that I’m happy to announce that I will be joining an independent, smaller firm next week where I will have control and authority to do some pretty remarkable things beyond what one discipline with a bolt-on solution can offer.

    Which one? Well, I’m not going to let the cat out of the bag just yet. Needless to say that after six years and four months with the only agency I’ve ever known it’s going to be a different world for me. I’ve had a lot of great opportunities with MS&L and got to show the world’s largest companies my marketing chops and for that I will be eternally grateful. I’ve worked with some brilliant people and have had access to C-level executives, brand managers, marketing directors and clients that most agencies dream of. The journey has been difficult, long and at times extremely challenging but it’s one that I believe has prepared me for this new opportunity. I’ve played “intrapreneur”, if you will, for years, within a big company — so it will be a lot of fun to build a business again, this time on a much different scale with new partners and clients.

    I’ll spill the beans soon on where I’m headed once the time is right. Until then, I’ll continue to zag while everyone else zigs.

     
    • Vinny 1:35 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations, bud. Looking forward to seeing what's next for ya!

    • Betsy Shilts Smith 1:44 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      congratulations to you and your size 16's 🙂 – best of luck in the new role! i'll be watching the twitters for those spilled beans.

    • Tonja Deegan 2:19 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Go shake 'em up, Dave!

    • Eric Walker 2:30 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I don't know you and I've never been to this blog before. I followed a link from Shannon Paul at Twitter. I played “intrapreneur” for a lot less of a time than you, and our stories are much different, but I understand where you're coming from in this post. Nicely written. I'm in month two of developing a new internet business. I'm going with small is better. As you say, “nimble” and flexible. Best of luck

    • Backpacking Dad 4:28 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Gretzky's other great expression is: “You miss 100% of the shots you don't take.” Good luck.

    • Tom Biro 6:53 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Congrats, Dave! Really psyched to see where you land and what you get going next!Also, is this the place I should be pointing out that Gretzky's dad said that?#shootsmessenger

    • dbinkowski 8:00 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks Tom.Are you telling me that Brainy Quotes.com lied to me???http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/w/wayn

    • dbinkowski 8:01 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Also very applicable. Thanks!

    • dbinkowski 8:01 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks Eric!

    • dbinkowski 8:02 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks Vinny!

    • dbinkowski 8:02 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      ha. Thanks… Betsy?? 😉

    • dbinkowski 8:02 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      That's the plan… I might need some help, ya know! 🙂

    • Joe Chernov 4:44 pm on June 17, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Great post, man! Dying to know where you land. One of my favorite sports quotes came from a fading Reggie Jackson, in an interview I remember from when I was 11 years old. The reporter asked him if he felt he had a good season, and as he began reciting his decent but unremarkable stats he interrupted himself and said, “If you have to look for stats to prove you had a good year, you didn't have a good year.” Sometimes we all need to know when to jump. Here's to a good year for you.

    • ShannonNelson 12:41 am on June 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      So I shouldn't really post a comment, since I really owe Shamable a lot of posts….But wow, I had no idea about this new turning point in your life. Excited to hear where you are going next!

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    It’s Time for Me to Zag 

    Wayne Gretzky has one of the greatest sayings of all time that has stuck with me since I heard it several years ago. When asked what the difference between a good hockey player and a great hockey player was, he said, “A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be.”

    I’m not comparing myself to the Great One by any stretch of the imagination. However, if you’ve read my blog posts and pay attention to the agency world – and most important, listen to your clients – you know the business is changing fast. A few companies are growing larger and larger while others are starting up, shifting focus or being bought. The lines between advertising, PR and digital agencies has been blurred so badly that it’s difficult to really tell what their differentiation really is. The PR firm has hired digital teams, the ad agencies now have PR folks and the digital shops, well, they claim to be able to do everything the other two can do but better. Which totally makes sense given their long time lines, production-shop mentality and outsourcing. Oh wait — it doesn’t.

    I still think PR has the leg up because of their ability to respond quickly with messaging, something the other shops will only see as a “bolt on” solution for clients. “Make this ad (or website) ‘PR-able!'” is a request I’ve heard all too many times from the large players, who are raking in millions of dollars for creative, only to watch it fall flat because the smart sounding British dudes in funky glasses oversold the impact their widget would have. “EVERYONE WILL BE DOWNLOADING YOUR WIDGET!” they’d say. The whole thing has clients heads spinning and this is before you even factor in social media-specific shops, also known as the dodo bird of the agency world.

    Back to large agencies for a second: In certain instances, it makes a lot of sense for a multinational business that spans many continents to hire a large agency because they need the scale and as such can negotiate competitive rates. This makes procurement happy because it’s one contract with one holding company and theoretically they’re saving a few bucks. I’ve yet to see this model work flawlessly as typically campaigns are customized and executed differently in local markets, but I digress.

    Conversely, there are companies (and marketers) looking to smaller firms that can be nimble, provide senior level thinking and attention on a regular basis to help guide them through the ever changing business and marketing landscape while providing the creativity and speed that their multinational counterparts can’t offer.  I truly believe the agency world is changing and that while for the past several years I’ve worked at the former, it’s time to go where the puck is going. It’s with that that I’m happy to announce that I will be joining an independent, smaller firm next week where I will have control and authority to do some pretty remarkable things beyond what one discipline with a bolt-on solution can offer.

    Which one? Well, I’m not going to let the cat out of the bag just yet. Needless to say that after six years and four months with the only agency I’ve ever known it’s going to be a different world for me. I’ve had a lot of great opportunities with MS&L and got to show the world’s largest companies my marketing chops and for that I will be eternally grateful. I’ve worked with some brilliant people and have had access to C-level executives, brand managers, marketing directors and clients that most agencies dream of. The journey has been difficult, long and at times extremely challenging but it’s one that I believe has prepared me for this new opportunity. I’ve played “intrapreneur”, if you will, for years, within a big company — so it will be a lot of fun to build a business again, this time on a much different scale with new partners and clients.

    I’ll spill the beans soon on where I’m headed once the time is right. Until then, I’ll continue to zag while everyone else zigs.

     
    • Vinny 1:35 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Congratulations, bud. Looking forward to seeing what's next for ya!

    • Betsy Shilts Smith 1:44 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      congratulations to you and your size 16's 🙂 – best of luck in the new role! i'll be watching the twitters for those spilled beans.

    • Tonja Deegan 2:19 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Go shake 'em up, Dave!

    • Eric Walker 2:30 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I don't know you and I've never been to this blog before. I followed a link from Shannon Paul at Twitter. I played “intrapreneur” for a lot less of a time than you, and our stories are much different, but I understand where you're coming from in this post. Nicely written. I'm in month two of developing a new internet business. I'm going with small is better. As you say, “nimble” and flexible. Best of luck

    • Backpacking Dad 4:28 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Gretzky's other great expression is: “You miss 100% of the shots you don't take.” Good luck.

    • Tom Biro 6:53 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Congrats, Dave! Really psyched to see where you land and what you get going next!Also, is this the place I should be pointing out that Gretzky's dad said that?#shootsmessenger

    • dbinkowski 8:00 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks Tom.Are you telling me that Brainy Quotes.com lied to me???http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/w/wayn

    • dbinkowski 8:01 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Also very applicable. Thanks!

    • dbinkowski 8:01 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks Eric!

    • dbinkowski 8:02 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks Vinny!

    • dbinkowski 8:02 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      ha. Thanks… Betsy?? 😉

    • dbinkowski 8:02 pm on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      That's the plan… I might need some help, ya know! 🙂

    • Joe Chernov 4:44 pm on June 17, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Great post, man! Dying to know where you land. One of my favorite sports quotes came from a fading Reggie Jackson, in an interview I remember from when I was 11 years old. The reporter asked him if he felt he had a good season, and as he began reciting his decent but unremarkable stats he interrupted himself and said, “If you have to look for stats to prove you had a good year, you didn't have a good year.” Sometimes we all need to know when to jump. Here's to a good year for you.

    • ShannonNelson 12:41 am on June 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      So I shouldn't really post a comment, since I really owe Shamable a lot of posts….But wow, I had no idea about this new turning point in your life. Excited to hear where you are going next!

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    It’s Time for Me to Zag 

    Wayne Gretzky has one of the greatest sayings of all time that has stuck with me since I heard it several years ago. When asked what the difference between a good hockey player and a great hockey player was, he said, “A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be.”

    I’m not comparing myself to the Great One by any stretch of the imagination. However, if you’ve read my blog posts and pay attention to the agency world – and most important, listen to your clients – you know the business is changing fast. A few companies are growing larger and larger while others are starting up, shifting focus or being bought. The lines between advertising, PR and digital agencies has been blurred so badly that it’s difficult to really tell what their differentiation really is. The PR firm has hired digital teams, the ad agencies now have PR folks and the digital shops, well, they claim to be able to do everything the other two can do but better. Which totally makes sense given their long time lines, production-shop mentality and outsourcing. Oh wait — it doesn’t.

    I still think PR has the leg up because of their ability to respond quickly with messaging, something the other shops will only see as a “bolt on” solution for clients. “Make this ad (or website) ‘PR-able!'” is a request I’ve heard all too many times from the large players, who are raking in millions of dollars for creative, only to watch it fall flat because the smart sounding British dudes in funky glasses oversold the impact their widget would have. “EVERYONE WILL BE DOWNLOADING YOUR WIDGET!” they’d say. The whole thing has clients heads spinning and this is before you even factor in social media-specific shops, also known as the dodo bird of the agency world.

    Back to large agencies for a second: In certain instances, it makes a lot of sense for a multinational business that spans many continents to hire a large agency because they need the scale and as such can negotiate competitive rates. This makes procurement happy because it’s one contract with one holding company and theoretically they’re saving a few bucks. I’ve yet to see this model work flawlessly as typically campaigns are customized and executed differently in local markets, but I digress.

    Conversely, there are companies (and marketers) looking to smaller firms that can be nimble, provide senior level thinking and attention on a regular basis to help guide them through the ever changing business and marketing landscape while providing the creativity and speed that their multinational counterparts can’t offer.  I truly believe the agency world is changing and that while for the past several years I’ve worked at the former, it’s time to go where the puck is going. It’s with that that I’m happy to announce that I will be joining an independent, smaller firm next week where I will have control and authority to do some pretty remarkable things beyond what one discipline with a bolt-on solution can offer.

    Which one? Well, I’m not going to let the cat out of the bag just yet. Needless to say that after six years and four months with the only agency I’ve ever known it’s going to be a different world for me. I’ve had a lot of great opportunities with MS&L and got to show the world’s largest companies my marketing chops and for that I will be eternally grateful. I’ve worked with some brilliant people and have had access to C-level executives, brand managers, marketing directors and clients that most agencies dream of. The journey has been difficult, long and at times extremely challenging but it’s one that I believe has prepared me for this new opportunity. I’ve played “intrapreneur”, if you will, for years, within a big company — so it will be a lot of fun to build a business again, this time on a much different scale with new partners and clients.

    I’ll spill the beans soon on where I’m headed once the time is right. Until then, I’ll continue to zag while everyone else zigs.

     
c
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