Updates from February, 2008 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • dbinkowski 3:25 am on February 15, 2008 Permalink | Reply  

    Bloggio, a new service to spam top tier bloggers 

    A new spam e-mail service has launched called Bloggio, promising to help connect “marketers” with “Top tier bloggers”. Don’t bother looking it up by going to the dot com — these mofo’s went all non-profit ‘n shit, bypassing the .com for the .org — so you know they’re legit. Hey, the site, which redirects you to blogg.io once you click on the About page, says it was started by “3 guys” in New York who have 2 offices — one in the city and another up state… which, IMHO, is a lot of overhead to be carrying around for a 3 person operation. But I digress…

    For marketers, the objective of the service is to help those inept at participating in the blogosphere to gain coverage with “top tier bloggers” by simply using a web-based, Word-esque editor, picking your vertical, paying $300 and viola! — you might get written about. On the plus side these guys aren’t promising you’ll get written about and have an ethics policy, unlike PayPerPost who was dragged kicking and screaming into the discussion. On the down side, well, you probably just wasted $300 and pissed off the “top tier” bloggers within a vertical.

    Sounds great, right? I mean, how hard can getting a “top blogger” to write about your stuff be? Bloggio also provides tips to help you to get bloggers to write about your products! Gee willikers! I guess the only more useless link would be out to the PRSA web site so you can learn this brainless skill within minutes and call yourself a PR professional! [insert sarcasm here]

    As with everything else in life, if it sounds too good to be true — it is. We’ve seen the downside of paying bloggers to write on behalf of your products. And if it was as easy as spamming the “top tier” bloggers to get coverage than anyone could do this without the help of the service. I mean, theoretically, you could go through each “top” blog, add their email address to your Outlook and BCC them all and save yourself the $300. You’ll also ensure a spot in these bloggers spam folder and still not get coverage. But at least you’d save $300.

    Another reason this is a waste of money is that sites like Guy Kawasaki’s alltop.com and Technorati make it pretty easy to find a “top” list… so there goes the inaccessibility of finding the top blogs within a category.

    Yet another reason this is a waste for marketers is that the art and science of pitching a blogger involves not only reading their blog and figuring out who’ll be receptive to a pitch, which is significantly different from selecting a series of check boxes on Bloggio, but also tailoring your pitch to fit with the content of their site. Never mind that whole “joining the community” thing that Jeremy talks about, or the whole “forming relationships” PR thing. Nope, this is straight up pay to play, except instead of playing you’re now a spammer. Welcome to Chris Anderson’s Spammer 2.0 list.

    Finally, the biggest joke about the Bloggio model is that while it’s great to know the top tier bloggers within a vertical, the reality is that search and the multilogue have enabled bloggers outside of the “top tier” an equal voice. Want to know how to engage bloggers within your vertical? Take the time to engage. Start a blog. Have a voice, an opinion and join the discussion.

    I’d love to hear from bloggers what they feel the benefits of this service are/will be. My initial thought is: “What? I can get more crap thrown my way for potentially pennies on the dollar if I write about it? Where do I sign up?”

    Update: As a test to sign up as a blogger I received an “object reference not set to an instance of an object” error message. Klass.

    digg_url = ‘http://digg.com/tech_news/Bloggio_a_new_service_to_spam_top_tier_bloggers’;

     
    • FauxClaud 9:06 pm on February 15, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Hi David,

      First off, I do have to honestly thank you for taking the time to write about Blogg.io and put your feelings out there. Of course, my initial excitement over seeing an Email alert on the subject was quickly dampened when I read your reservations, but I welcome the opportunity to hopefully clear up some of those more negative assumptions.

      To begin, I feel an introduction is necessary. So Hi! My name is Claudia D’Arcy and yes, I do work for Blogg.io, but before that, I am a Blogger myself since 2005 (Musings of the Lame). To me, this qualification is completely necessary as I do intimately understand the way the community works and yes, ethically, if I thought my position here was to spam my peers and do harm, then I wouldn’t be morally able to do so. Plus, the “three guys”, truthfully, are really into benefiting and supporting Bloggers as a whole. It’s not like they just see an easy way to make a few bucks. I couldn’t work for them then.

      Anyway, since you did pose some very compelling observations, I would like to go through them point by point.

      Now I know you picked this up that it’s not pay per post at all and Bloggers are under NO obligation to post about anything or to post whatever they choose, but since that’s really important, I have to state it again, though thank you.

      You bring up that communication from Blogg.io is just more Spam, but I have to object to that. It’s more like Anti-Spam. For one, it is a service that Bloggers must choose to sign up for. They will be requesting it and, then, they will only be receiving relevant information from the fields they have chosen. For instance, right now I am working on a promo for a client who is dealing with a wine promotion, and while I have a list of wine blogs that should have interest in this communication that will be invited to have access to the announcement, anyone within our data base who has self determined that they have an interest in wine will also be given the same consideration.

      Yes, the appeal to PR firms is pretty simple. I guess it might seem like an easy skill to learn, the whole “engaging bloggers thing” but, it’s kind of clear that the ideals of Blogging are more obtuse to someone outside the’ sphere. All anyone has to do is Google “bad pitches” and the horror stories come springing forth. The ideal is that while we know that many companies have begun to see Blogs as a legitimate way to get information out, many do not understand the network and relationships that are crucial to Blogging and fail miserably in their outreach programs. If Bloggers have the ability to control what information they receive based on what they have determined what their interest are, then they have the opportunity to have better content which will benefit the reader and the community on a whole.

      For the marketer, building the relationships is also time consuming. Yes, theoretically, anyone can do this, but I think what we do see is that they don’t want to or they have no clue how to. Personally, I am kind of glad that they are clueless, as now I have this cool job where I get to blog, read blogs, read about blogs, and do blogging like things all day. They won’t be wasting their money as long as Blogg.io is not seen….well…the way you put it.

      Now, with that, it’s becoming more obvious to me that some of the copy on the main site needs some reworking. For one, I am going to stamp my foot and make sure that they term “A list” is off before the end of the day today. It’s just yucky, I think, and seems to infer some “elite” mentality we have. No such thing. It is referring to blogs within their niches that are established, have a following, are self determined to have expertise in their fields, etc. While invitations go out to blogs that we have targeted as such in certain fields, the ability to join Blogg.io is open to anyone who does blog. It’s not at all like, say the Nikon outreach, where 50 Bloggers were selected based on some unknown criteria forming an “elite” group.

      And, truthfully, I don’t really see some of the real “top Technorati” blogs as ever subscribing to the services for a) they don’t need the money and b) they have enough thrown at them already, and c) they don’t seem to search for content either. I do not see anyone making a significant amount of income off of reading a Blogg.io communiqué as our current pay scale is about $15.00 per review, but it is better than “pennies”. For a smaller Blogger, perhaps getting their server paid for the month will be a nice perk of blogging. The payment is essentially for the Bloggers’ time that they spent to review the communiqué which is hoped to be seen as recognition that a Blogger’s time is worth money. And again, ethically, one of our stipulations is also that Bloggers will be reviewed by Blogg.io to insure that they are transparent in their dealings and that they notify their readers that they have received information through Blogg.io as well. Ethics are huge for us. And again, as a Blogger myself, I like that.

      We tried to not bypass the .com, but unfortunately it was previously unavailable and we just rectified that situation. The .com change should switched out by the end of next week. We have the “.io” domain as well, but there were issues with email filters in that. Right now the .org is the best we have until then. But that’s all there is to that, no other agenda.

      Oh, and your error message has been brought to the attention of our lead programmer to his horror. Something is still hinky inside the box, but is being rectified. Did you get a welcome email from the system? I am finding that the copy on the site is not clear enough and the impression left is….like yours. That just will not fly. So if you, and anyone else, want to throw some ideas for improvement out there either here if you don’t mind… (Well I guess you don’t since you invited it, but I did just bogart your comments)… that would be most excellent. Or if anyone wants to speak to myself directly, I shall leave my email as well.

      And again, sincerely, thank you for putting this out there. If you thought it was worth it, feel free to give us a call. I know that the founders, Don or Ric, would be happy to speak to you.

      Claudia D’Arcy
      Bloggio Blog Account Tech
      cdarcy@bloggio.org

      ps: And I FEAR Chris Anderson’s list!

    • Don M. 9:18 pm on February 15, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      I skimmed the post and the comment…initial thoughts is that it seems that the service takes the “personal” out of trying to pitch bloggers. It is more critical than ever to know the person your pitching. Yea, maybe this service will tell you which blogs are applicable for photography for example, but at the end of the day, will it help you build a stronger relationship with the blogger?

      No.

      On the surface, this seems like a mediamap of sorts for marketers and PR folks like myself.

      Call me old school, but I like doing my own research. Yea, maybe you can save me some time, but in the long run, are you really?

      Seems like waste of $$ to me.

    • David Binkowski 12:50 am on February 16, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Claudia,
      Thanks for the lengthy, detailed comment. I appreciate that you took the time to clear up the spam remark since the program is opt-in and that it doesn’t just involve the “top” bloggers within a category; as you pointed out the copy on the site does state that it reaches top blogs within a segment.

      I think your response proves my point about blogger relations, though — you carefully took the time to research how your company was being talked about, read my blog, spend the better part of the day crafting a detailed response and answered the bell, if you will. It’s that kind of thoughtfulness, attention to detail and level of attention that is required to do this well.

      Pushing content out isn’t a one way street — it’s a relationship that, by reading each blog individually and tweaking your pitch/angle will yield results. One blanket email blast doesn’t achieve that, and if bloggers really wanted to get linked in with specific companies they could either sign up for their email blasts directly or contact the PR department with an inquiry.

      BTW, as a test, I signed up for the service and didn’t get a response within roughly 24 hours. If a customer does have an issue like this, how does Bloggio account for it? Or does it just push content?

      Dave

    • David Binkowski 12:52 am on February 16, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      @Don M exactly

    • FauxClaud 3:04 pm on February 18, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      I agree that it’s definitely not a one way street and again, I agree, it isn’t rocket science either. A PR company might prefer to do the work themselves and build the relationships, which is great. Or a Blogger might decide to make their own contacts like your illustrated, but will they all? And will they do it well enough to get the results they desire?

      Yes, to do this well, then Bloggio does have to be thoughtful, research, pay attention to detail, etc …all the good things that we do expect from the Blogging community. And as stated, I feel I am one lucky woman, because I get to do this.

      While I am hoping that your difficulty with the sign up process was a fluke, the fact is that the programming is still ongoing with the internals of the “box” as we keep on improving things to fit our needs. Indeed, that means we are still bug testing and your experiment thankfully alert us to that bug. Immediately after reading your post, I tested the sign up procedure again, and I didn’t get the same error message you reported, but instead the system “thank you”. So as far as accounting for this kind of issue, we fully intend to resolve such confusion so that the process is clear and accurate.

      And I know none of here, with the vision, thinks of it as “pushing” content. It’s giving the opportunity for content for those that wish it. In these early days, it might be saying “Hey…do you know about this and are you interested?” but I am sure not going to be stalking Bloggers and trying to drop Bloggio Widgets on their blogs in the dark of night!

    • David Binkowski 3:36 pm on February 18, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      Hi Claudia,
      I hate to break it to the folks running Bloggio but it’s not just PR agencies engaging with bloggers on a daily basis. In fact, most brands want to “own the relationships” — meaning they already know who’s talking about them and who they want to talk to because they’ve been monitoring and “list building” internally for at least a few years now.

      And if there’s one thing bloggers are probably not going to do is ask to be pitched more content. Most bloggers, even low level niche folks like me who blog once a week, get pitched weekly if not daily.

      The bottom line is that the tool isn’t relevant at this point – people can use other free services/tools and better methods to create relationships and ultimately get their content out to bloggers. Even small business owners, who I’m assuming are a target because of the price point of Bloggio, can take a few minutes a day to email, engage on blogs or even start their own blog.

      It’s also a little late to declare that Bloggio is not for PR firms as someone from your company did pitch an EVP at my PR agency to use the service. I am your target audience, and I’m saying I would never consider using it and don’t think any of my clients would be interested either.

      Ultimately, what I’m saying is that Bloggio doesn’t bring anything new to the table and will fail unless it evolves into a useful tool.

      Dave

    • Don M. 4:08 pm on February 18, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      An upper cut to the chin. Dave’s got Bloggio on the ropes. A jab. Here comes the hay-maker. BLAM!

      Bloggio’s going down. The ref starts the count…one, two, three, four, five, six, seven…

    • David Binkowski 5:07 pm on February 18, 2008 Permalink | Reply

      In keeping with my theme of having the same number of Diggs as I do comments (not really), here’s a great post on Step #1 (Find the right people) for anyone looking for ways to find the right bloggers from WOMMA blog

  • dbinkowski 5:03 am on December 1, 2007 Permalink | Reply  

    No, really — THIS is the last take on Chris Anderson’s "outing" 

    At this point, everyone’s had their take on the Chris Anderson outing of 300+ PR folks. Here’s what I am declaring to be the last of the Wired meme. Jenn has the latest take, which for the most part I agree. Her conclusion is, essentially, that “we all have jobs” and “if you can’t handle your job, get out of the business”.

    I love how she brings it strong (hence the addition to my blogroll and now public, open invite to her to grab drinks the next time she’s in NYC), but regardless of whether or not Mr. Anderson agrees with how he’s pitched, there are three major issues I have with this topic:

    1. Classification. I had a client recent ask me what I thought of the “outing” — which, is aptly named once you read point #2 — and that if PR people had that negative of a perception in the blogosphere. The reality is that every marketer under the sun — interactive, advertising, “all-in-one”, in-house, and yes, PR — is sending out horrible, misguided pitches. Clients want “key messages”, “brand attributes” and even “strategic links” that they can account for — so let’s not pretend that everyone filling Mr. Anderson’s Inbox “gets it”– yet they’re all being lumped in as being part of Public Relations. (Side note: This the the argument for those who “get it” to make a call for centralization, if not massive education, of rules for ethical blogger relations).

    2. Bi-media. Ok, it’s a sexual reference — but Chris has the luxury of having a “traditional” media gig as well as blogger. Hell, make that tri-media once you count “author”. And no, I won’t try to make a sexual reference to that. Journalism rules and ethics are what he brings to the table, but the ability to be a greedy bastard — hence the Dennis Miller reference to being “bi, or in this case “tri” – and choose which part of his salary he chooses to follow — allows him to be snarky like a blogger for 1/3 of the day, a pro journalist for another 1/3, and, like it or not, an author/PR mouthpiece/self-promotional guy the other 1/3. Dennis called these folks “greedy”, that they need to “pick a side”. I’m not saying Chris should renounce any of his titles or roles, but he brings every imaginable perspective to the business, and that has to be, if nothing else, respected. His journalist role would just not return the email, voice mail or, dare I say, letter. The blogger side would get snarky. And the author side would look for a trend to exploit to publish a book and make a shitload of money (can you sense the jealously in that line?).

    3. Wake Up. I don’t see the outing as much as a “look who’s on [not on] the list”, to be honest. Yes, it’s nice to say we weren’t on it. Whatev. It’s not like it couldn’t happen to anyone. Every office of every company has a person trying to get ahead mean well but screws up. Most industries don’t have public forums like this to discuss it. Hell, it even seems like some companies openly dare you to take your story to sites like Consumerist by pissing customers off. Guy/gal is, as Jenn states, doing their job. That doesn’t mean they’re doing it well, but they are doing a job.

    In the big picture, the media and yes, marketers, have made bloggers what they are today — and ultimately they, meaning bloggers, set the rules. Nothing new there. I would dare say the media and Google — although now heavily invested in it — could take it away just as quickly. Look — my blog is what it is, and even I get crap pitches. I can only imagine what “popular” bloggers put up with on a daily basis. I easily get over 200 work-related email to answer per day, so I can imagine how, along with the aforementioned “business” mail, must wear on those wearing several hats and being a coveted “target” for outreach. If that doesn’t help shed some light to the agencies et al out there on how impersonal it’s become, then I don’t know what could. It’s like the worst part of advertising has become part of the trade — screw the relationship, it’s just about the numbers.

    The bottom line is that while as a marketing medium pitching blogs still works for a lot of folks, the reality is that there is a revolt. It might not as public as Chris’s, because they don’t have the clout, but it’s going on because bloggers are tired of the bad pitches. PR agencies, et al, need to wake up and realize that the blogosphere isn’t there to do you favors and publish garbage… And they certainly don’t have to adhere to traditional PR rules and thus you must adjust your perspective, expectations and business model — not them.

    digg_url = ‘http://digg.com/tech_news/No_really_this_is_the_last_take_on_Wired_s_Chris_Anderson_s_outing_of_PR’;

     
  • dbinkowski 5:03 am on December 1, 2007 Permalink | Reply  

    No, really — THIS is the last take on Chris Anderson’s “outing” 

    At this point, everyone’s had their take on the Chris Anderson outing of 300+ PR folks. Here’s what I am declaring to be the last of the Wired meme. Jenn has the latest take, which for the most part I agree. Her conclusion is, essentially, that “we all have jobs” and “if you can’t handle your job, get out of the business”.

    I love how she brings it strong (hence the addition to my blogroll and now public, open invite to her to grab drinks the next time she’s in NYC), but regardless of whether or not Mr. Anderson agrees with how he’s pitched, there are three major issues I have with this topic:

    1. Classification. I had a client recent ask me what I thought of the “outing” — which, is aptly named once you read point #2 — and that if PR people had that negative of a perception in the blogosphere. The reality is that every marketer under the sun — interactive, advertising, “all-in-one”, in-house, and yes, PR — is sending out horrible, misguided pitches. Clients want “key messages”, “brand attributes” and even “strategic links” that they can account for — so let’s not pretend that everyone filling Mr. Anderson’s Inbox “gets it”– yet they’re all being lumped in as being part of Public Relations. (Side note: This the the argument for those who “get it” to make a call for centralization, if not massive education, of rules for ethical blogger relations).

    2. Bi-media. Ok, it’s a sexual reference — but Chris has the luxury of having a “traditional” media gig as well as blogger. Hell, make that tri-media once you count “author”. And no, I won’t try to make a sexual reference to that. Journalism rules and ethics are what he brings to the table, but the ability to be a greedy bastard — hence the Dennis Miller reference to being “bi, or in this case “tri” – and choose which part of his salary he chooses to follow — allows him to be snarky like a blogger for 1/3 of the day, a pro journalist for another 1/3, and, like it or not, an author/PR mouthpiece/self-promotional guy the other 1/3. Dennis called these folks “greedy”, that they need to “pick a side”. I’m not saying Chris should renounce any of his titles or roles, but he brings every imaginable perspective to the business, and that has to be, if nothing else, respected. His journalist role would just not return the email, voice mail or, dare I say, letter. The blogger side would get snarky. And the author side would look for a trend to exploit to publish a book and make a shitload of money (can you sense the jealously in that line?).

    3. Wake Up. I don’t see the outing as much as a “look who’s on [not on] the list”, to be honest. Yes, it’s nice to say we weren’t on it. Whatev. It’s not like it couldn’t happen to anyone. Every office of every company has a person trying to get ahead mean well but screws up. Most industries don’t have public forums like this to discuss it. Hell, it even seems like some companies openly dare you to take your story to sites like Consumerist by pissing customers off. Guy/gal is, as Jenn states, doing their job. That doesn’t mean they’re doing it well, but they are doing a job.

    In the big picture, the media and yes, marketers, have made bloggers what they are today — and ultimately they, meaning bloggers, set the rules. Nothing new there. I would dare say the media and Google — although now heavily invested in it — could take it away just as quickly. Look — my blog is what it is, and even I get crap pitches. I can only imagine what “popular” bloggers put up with on a daily basis. I easily get over 200 work-related email to answer per day, so I can imagine how, along with the aforementioned “business” mail, must wear on those wearing several hats and being a coveted “target” for outreach. If that doesn’t help shed some light to the agencies et al out there on how impersonal it’s become, then I don’t know what could. It’s like the worst part of advertising has become part of the trade — screw the relationship, it’s just about the numbers.

    The bottom line is that while as a marketing medium pitching blogs still works for a lot of folks, the reality is that there is a revolt. It might not as public as Chris’s, because they don’t have the clout, but it’s going on because bloggers are tired of the bad pitches. PR agencies, et al, need to wake up and realize that the blogosphere isn’t there to do you favors and publish garbage… And they certainly don’t have to adhere to traditional PR rules and thus you must adjust your perspective, expectations and business model — not them.

    digg_url = ‘http://digg.com/tech_news/No_really_this_is_the_last_take_on_Wired_s_Chris_Anderson_s_outing_of_PR’;

     
  • dbinkowski 7:38 pm on March 1, 2007 Permalink | Reply  

    PR, food, blogs… and sweat 

    I’m blogging from the PRSA Food & Beverage chapter conference in Charleston, South Carolina. Today’s sessions included product launches, new media, organics and sustainable agriculture, and coming up is a meet and greet with the media (drinks, anyone?). It’s not surprising that last night’s pre-conference meal and today’s lunch were both outstanding. I mean, this is the Food & Beverage conference after all. The conference started today and runs through tomorrow, piggybacking on the Charleston Food & Wine Festival going on this weekend.

    I had the pleasure of presenting on the New Media panel with Paul Cheney from Charleston Food Company. His presentation covered creating food communities where chefs, patrons and restaurateurs can interact through message boards. You can imagine that the local food industry Paul helps them show their stuff through thousands of food photos, because, as he succinctly stated, “Everyone has to eat” and that the first thing people judge food with is their eyes.

    I want to thank Kathryn Newton and Claire Burke, who help organize the Food & Beverage chapter and Tina Honer from PRSA for having me here. Here’s a nice picture of me sporting the “faux-hawk” with Kathryn (disclosure, Kathryn and I work together on projects for a client):

    Did I mention that this yankee isn’t used to the humidity? Crikey…

     
  • dbinkowski 7:38 pm on March 1, 2007 Permalink | Reply  

    PR, food, blogs… and sweat 

    I’m blogging from the PRSA Food & Beverage chapter conference in Charleston, South Carolina. Today’s sessions included product launches, new media, organics and sustainable agriculture, and coming up is a meet and greet with the media (drinks, anyone?). It’s not surprising that last night’s pre-conference meal and today’s lunch were both outstanding. I mean, this is the Food & Beverage conference after all. The conference started today and runs through tomorrow, piggybacking on the Charleston Food & Wine Festival going on this weekend.

    I had the pleasure of presenting on the New Media panel with Paul Cheney from Charleston Food Company. His presentation covered creating food communities where chefs, patrons and restaurateurs can interact through message boards. You can imagine that the local food industry Paul helps them show their stuff through thousands of food photos, because, as he succinctly stated, “Everyone has to eat” and that the first thing people judge food with is their eyes.

    I want to thank Kathryn Newton and Claire Burke, who help organize the Food & Beverage chapter and Tina Honer from PRSA for having me here. Here’s a nice picture of me sporting the “faux-hawk” with Kathryn (disclosure, Kathryn and I work together on projects for a client):

    Did I mention that this yankee isn’t used to the humidity? Crikey…

     
  • dbinkowski 3:18 am on February 8, 2007 Permalink | Reply  

    Recap: Blogger ethics in Ann Arbor this morning 

    I had the pleasure of presenting an updated version of my “Blogger Relations: Rules of the Road” presentation to members of the Ann Arbor PR Council this morning. Agencies and brands alike filled the room to learn the 10 Simple Rules as issued by our council on blogger ethics.

    The Q&A session featured excellent questions such as ethics and recent missteps in the blogosphere, SEO and how to apply the session’s knowledge directly to their brand.

    In particular, I want to focus on a non-profit company that attended called SOS Community Services. They help homeless families, children and individuals in Washtenaw County, which is home to our Ann Arbor crew. Nancy from SOS was in attendance and asked about getting traffic to her blog, in particular if I thought non-profits should be blogging and if they should focus on local blogs or take their campaigns national. My advice?

    First – should they blog? Absolutely. Blogging about a subject you and others are passionate about is a no-brainer. They’re set up through Blogger so it’s free minus her time, which as a means to publish news is cheaper than maintaining a content management system and faster than waiting for a volunteer to update the site.

    Now onto improving the blog. There are a ton of great articles online for reference, but given time constraints and the forum I offered up a few quick nuggets:

    1. Create a blog roll, which she did as soon as she got back to the office.

    2. Talk to some of the other local bloggers. Comment on their blogs.

    3. If you like their stuff, link to them and ask for a reciprocal link. Obviously stay relevant with your comments and contact.

    4. Tag your posts.

    5. Publish frequently, but more importantly when it makes sense.

    Go national? Absolutely. In fact, by blogging you’re already going national if not global. This little blog gets regular views from Brazil, Canada, India and various European countries.

    In case you’ve never been, Ann Arbor is the kind of city people fall in love with — many move back. And you may have heard some news about some guys who decided to bring a branch of their business back to their beloved college town (side note: the Pfizer grounds would make an outstanding midwest GooglePlex!).

    A good number of New Yorkers have and are attending the U, and I recall hearing that California is the number one state Michigan grads call home after graduation. Go national? I’ll reiterate – absolutely.

    MS&L has taken on pro-bono work in the past and I would expect to continue to help Nancy and SOS with this project. Show her some love by visiting her blog at http://soscs.blogspot.com/.

     
  • dbinkowski 12:43 am on December 14, 2006 Permalink | Reply  

    How to Not Get Called An Asshat, the FTC and Andy – Oh my! 

    This morning I had the pleasure of presenting the agency perspective on blogger relations with Mike Masnick from Techdirt. Mike prefaced his portion of the presentation by saying he may be controversial with his points, but there wasn’t any arguing coming from me – he’s completely right. PR people need to respect the rules of the venue and engage in blog conversations if they want to be heard. And for any PR folks who are reading this, please don’t pitch Mike.

    There’s a brief recap of what we talked about over on the WOMMA Summit blog (yes, I used the word “Asshat” in my presentation). E-mail me if you want a full copy of my presentation. There are also pictures from the conference over on Flickr (not mine though).

    I’ve also joined in on Mike’s discussion about the FTC ruling about word of mouth marketing. There are valid points being made, join me if you wish. Basically the FTC said you must disclose if you’re getting compensation for products.

    Finally, in case you haven’t heard, WOMMA CEO Andy Sernovitz announced Monday at the conference that he’s leaving the association for greener pastures (we call it entrepreneurship) when his contract expires on April 1, 2007. Best of luck to him, the man has taken a start up and made it into a 330 company-strong association. I have absolutely no doubt that he will do well.

    Tagged: , , , , ,

     
    • Mike Masnick 8:18 am on December 14, 2006 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      Great to meet you and share the presenting stage. I think you’re right that our two presentations complemented each other nicely. One person came up afterwards and suggested the two of us team up and go on the road with our presentations. 🙂

      Thanks for joining the conversation over at Techdirt too!

c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel