Updates from July, 2010 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Old Spice Social Media Buzz Doesn't Equal Sales 

    For the love of God, put your shirt on.

    For the longest time I used to think that PR agencies didn’t get social media. “Give me impressions!” was the public relations mantra because it meant that they could easily transfer their knowledge of publication circulation multipliers into the emerging field called “social media”. Screw the long tail, screw review web sites, screw message boards and all of the other “unimportant” groups online because “they don’t have reach”.

    “We want to take on the ad agencies head on!” was the PR agency rallying cry, and even though most ad agencies are going down the wrong route, and no matter how many decks you presented to them that this gimmick marketing was the wrong approach, they continued to push to ignore the long tail, ignore communities and ignore what actually drives sales. What’s come full circle is that the coveted social media reach play online that ad agencies have been great at have one thing in common: they don’t work.

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    • quikness 2:31 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was at a roundtable discussion recently where i brought up the report that this campaign hasn't translated into sales and got a pretty good response from one of the other attendees: deodorant or soap isn't something you rush out to buy. You buy it when you run out.If Old Spice can keep this train rolling for another month or two they just might get the sales uptick they're ultimately looking for. And by all accounts, that seems to be what they are trying to do. Its like an all out assault.

    • Marc Meyer 3:23 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe we need to hear from P&G or Wieden. What was the purpose? If it was Buzz only-then it was a home run. If it was to drive sales to a product that still smells the same as it did when my Dad wore it..then we know the answer. Riddle me this, how much of this social blitz was actually about the product?

    • dbinkowski 5:01 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shouldn't the goal always tie back to sales? The rest is just noise and stuff that the trades and award-givers go nuts for.

    • c2cmom 10:48 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, the success should be tied to sales and business impact, and ditto quikness. I disagree that they missed their mark and audience. Old Spice succeeded in resurrecting a tired product to hotness. Hot guy with sense of humor = sexy for millions of wives and girlfriends across the country. While Twitter and YouTube are immediate mediums, the use of deodorant and bodysoap have a slower cycle, and are not purchased on a daily basis, like say, coffee, which could be measured and evaluated within maybe a week. Besides, who purchases deodorant or body soap for most households? 😉 Old Spice at BlogHer makes a lot of sense to buoy the brand and continue the buzz among the women purchasing the wash.Mark, if that's the case, I bet there are millions of 20-something or 30-something year old gals with subliminal memories of the security and manliness of their dads with Old Spice. As right or wrong as that may be . . .;-) On the other hand, that could also be why they weren't focusing on the scent in this campaign to reinvigorate the brand.Either way, when I was on a panel about why and when moms choose to talk about brands and products via social media at the Yahoo! Mother Board Summit last week, as soon as I mentioned the Old Spice campaign, the room of 60 educated and thoughtful women from around the country – many of whom I imagine have disposable income – lit up momentarily. Sharing hubbies and old boyfriends whom used it, laughing about the different videos. Bullseye. Ya know what else? I actually stopped to check it out (price, scent, ingredients) while at CVS for cotton balls today. Not proud. Not ashamed either.

    • Peter Çoopèr 9:21 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah, because all forms of marketing and branding are about selling products within weeks of exposure. Or not. This is a long term game.

    • Soup 9:22 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I bought deodorant today and laughed when I saw the Old Spice. I didn't buy it because I don't like how it smells. Simple as that. Loved the campaign though. Being entertaining doesn't make me want to buy your product unless your product is entertainment.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Motherhood Uncensored 12:56 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      No hot guy on a horse is going to change the fact that it smells like crap. I agree that it was aimed at the wrong crowd. No doubt, it's funny and somewhat entertaining, but would it make me or my husband (who buys his own darn body wash and deo) go out and buy it? No way. They were banking on stats (and maybe rightfully so) that women do all the household buying. So maybe I should be offended that Old Spice thought I'd be so swayed by the sexy man to run out and buy it for mine.I've heard differing numbers on whether this campaign actually did well or not, but overall, I think it did well for brand awareness, but changing what's been ingrained in our heads over the years “Old Spice is for old dudes,” I still think that.

    • dbinkowski 8:54 pm on July 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well, they quickly rushed to the trades to justify their campaign and reported sales were up. However, the fact that the product is also heavily discounted wasn't really mentioned. In a crap economy, cheapest product wins, not “those with the most tweets”.

    • karimkanji 3:14 pm on August 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      You say it was a failure but you use only opinion and not facts. What about the increase in sales that was reported? Would love your thoughts and analysis on this.

      kk

      • dbinkowski 4:56 pm on October 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment! There are two facts that are true:

        1. The brand was heavily discounted during this time period. Social media or not, consumers are looking to save money and a 1/2 price item within a category doesn’t need social media to sell.

        2. The ROI of this campaign has yet to be proven. Yes, there were sales and yes they used social media, however at what cost and what return? Until those factors have been added in it’s way too premature for the agency that created it to be pitching trades on what a huge success this was by simply showing Nielsen data on sales. If the product was a loss leader then it’s not a “win” IMO.

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Old Spice Social Media Buzz Doesn’t Equal Sales 

    For the love of God, put your shirt on.

    For the longest time I used to think that PR agencies didn’t get social media. “Give me impressions!” was the public relations mantra because it meant that they could easily transfer their knowledge of publication circulation multipliers into the emerging field called “social media”. Screw the long tail, screw review web sites, screw message boards and all of the other “unimportant” groups online because “they don’t have reach”.

    “We want to take on the ad agencies head on!” was the PR agency rallying cry, and even though most ad agencies are going down the wrong route, and no matter how many decks you presented to them that this gimmick marketing was the wrong approach, they continued to push to ignore the long tail, ignore communities and ignore what actually drives sales. What’s come full circle is that the coveted social media reach play online that ad agencies have been great at have one thing in common: they don’t work.

    (More …)

     
    • quikness 2:31 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was at a roundtable discussion recently where i brought up the report that this campaign hasn't translated into sales and got a pretty good response from one of the other attendees: deodorant or soap isn't something you rush out to buy. You buy it when you run out.If Old Spice can keep this train rolling for another month or two they just might get the sales uptick they're ultimately looking for. And by all accounts, that seems to be what they are trying to do. Its like an all out assault.

    • Marc Meyer 3:23 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe we need to hear from P&G or Wieden. What was the purpose? If it was Buzz only-then it was a home run. If it was to drive sales to a product that still smells the same as it did when my Dad wore it..then we know the answer. Riddle me this, how much of this social blitz was actually about the product?

    • dbinkowski 5:01 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shouldn't the goal always tie back to sales? The rest is just noise and stuff that the trades and award-givers go nuts for.

    • c2cmom 10:48 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, the success should be tied to sales and business impact, and ditto quikness. I disagree that they missed their mark and audience. Old Spice succeeded in resurrecting a tired product to hotness. Hot guy with sense of humor = sexy for millions of wives and girlfriends across the country. While Twitter and YouTube are immediate mediums, the use of deodorant and bodysoap have a slower cycle, and are not purchased on a daily basis, like say, coffee, which could be measured and evaluated within maybe a week. Besides, who purchases deodorant or body soap for most households? 😉 Old Spice at BlogHer makes a lot of sense to buoy the brand and continue the buzz among the women purchasing the wash.Mark, if that's the case, I bet there are millions of 20-something or 30-something year old gals with subliminal memories of the security and manliness of their dads with Old Spice. As right or wrong as that may be . . .;-) On the other hand, that could also be why they weren't focusing on the scent in this campaign to reinvigorate the brand.Either way, when I was on a panel about why and when moms choose to talk about brands and products via social media at the Yahoo! Mother Board Summit last week, as soon as I mentioned the Old Spice campaign, the room of 60 educated and thoughtful women from around the country – many of whom I imagine have disposable income – lit up momentarily. Sharing hubbies and old boyfriends whom used it, laughing about the different videos. Bullseye. Ya know what else? I actually stopped to check it out (price, scent, ingredients) while at CVS for cotton balls today. Not proud. Not ashamed either.

    • Peter Çoopèr 9:21 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah, because all forms of marketing and branding are about selling products within weeks of exposure. Or not. This is a long term game.

    • Soup 9:22 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I bought deodorant today and laughed when I saw the Old Spice. I didn't buy it because I don't like how it smells. Simple as that. Loved the campaign though. Being entertaining doesn't make me want to buy your product unless your product is entertainment.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Motherhood Uncensored 12:56 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      No hot guy on a horse is going to change the fact that it smells like crap. I agree that it was aimed at the wrong crowd. No doubt, it's funny and somewhat entertaining, but would it make me or my husband (who buys his own darn body wash and deo) go out and buy it? No way. They were banking on stats (and maybe rightfully so) that women do all the household buying. So maybe I should be offended that Old Spice thought I'd be so swayed by the sexy man to run out and buy it for mine.I've heard differing numbers on whether this campaign actually did well or not, but overall, I think it did well for brand awareness, but changing what's been ingrained in our heads over the years “Old Spice is for old dudes,” I still think that.

    • dbinkowski 8:54 pm on July 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well, they quickly rushed to the trades to justify their campaign and reported sales were up. However, the fact that the product is also heavily discounted wasn't really mentioned. In a crap economy, cheapest product wins, not “those with the most tweets”.

    • karimkanji 3:14 pm on August 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      You say it was a failure but you use only opinion and not facts. What about the increase in sales that was reported? Would love your thoughts and analysis on this.

      kk

      • dbinkowski 4:56 pm on October 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment! There are two facts that are true:

        1. The brand was heavily discounted during this time period. Social media or not, consumers are looking to save money and a 1/2 price item within a category doesn’t need social media to sell.

        2. The ROI of this campaign has yet to be proven. Yes, there were sales and yes they used social media, however at what cost and what return? Until those factors have been added in it’s way too premature for the agency that created it to be pitching trades on what a huge success this was by simply showing Nielsen data on sales. If the product was a loss leader then it’s not a “win” IMO.

  • dbinkowski 9:35 am on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: .co, domain names, domain registrars   

    Inc.com Grasping at Straws on .co Domains 

    For those who may’ve missed it, a new top level domain (TLD) was released yesterday called “.co”. Surprisingly Inc.com, a site and magazine I respect, went with a blog post advising readers to “run, don’t walk” to buy your .co domain today. Don’t fall for it, this is yet another domain registrar ploy and is a waste of your business’s money. Here’s why…

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    • A Whole Lot of Nothing 1:50 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Just like everything else in the internet world, they are trends. Now, I'm off to buy a .xxx domain for my family's website just for funsies.

    • Dave Saunders 2:28 pm on July 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Perhaps I reading something extra into your text, but I don't recall .org and .net being created as part of a scare tactic. Those top level domains were included in the proposed domain hierarchy of RFC 1032, written in 1987. In the mid to late 90s people started to register their businesses and trademarks under multiple top level domains in direct response to cybersquatters who were deliberately and willfully violating those trademarks. I don't recall it being a scare tactic with the domain services as much as a response to what was happening around us at the time. I agree with you that the “sky is falling” approach to registering with every top level domain is not entirely useful. Where is the line and how do you choose which top levels not to register for? Stop the insanity, right?I think there may be legal and fiduciary questions which transcend whether or not it seems like a necessity. I've been told by IP Lawyers that ignoring opportunities to protect your copyrights and trademarks weakens your protection when you find yourself actually fighting for it. If you're the owner of a business, does it make sense to not pay $10 to register a top level domain that at least suggests itself to play in your space?

  • dbinkowski 10:09 am on July 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , influencer project, izea, , , todd and   

    Fast Company’s Influence Project Is A Complete Sham 

    For anyone following this meme on Twitter, Fast Company recently launched a site called “Influence Project”, where they’re essentially pitting online “influencers” against one another to vote for their influencer ranking. The Project is being pushed left and right on Twitter and Facebook and I’m sure elsewhere, but at this point I’ve tuned out from it, not because I don’t want to vote for my friends but because it’s like watching cattle being lined up onto a conveyor belt only to be lead to slaughter.

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    • Jeff Tippett 3:59 pm on July 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Trolling around for posts on the Influencer Project. Thanks for posting.

    • Anna Viele 7:48 pm on July 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was wondering what that was. Makes sense. They will still need content producers, but they won't need people who make a business of showing people who the influnecers are, or how to be influential, or whose business is “influence.”

    • Krista Neher 10:21 pm on July 9, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! Part of the issue is that REAL influencers rise to the top naturally through their actual influence whereas in most of the examples you mention it is more about a popularity contest. The most popular people (or those who can be bothered to harass their friends to vote for them) are not usually actually the most influential.Additionally, many companies who try to leverage influencers totally miss the mark by assuming that “influencers” will pimp their audiences in return for free product. Real influencers have it because they don't do that (and they probably also have better things to do then harass people to vote for them).On a side note, we should launch the Social Media Cool Kids Awards – to enter you have to link to my site 10 times and also drive your friends to my blog to vote. You also have to give me your entire email address book to add to my mailing list. You In? </sarcasm>

    • dbinkowski 4:32 pm on July 10, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Exactly. Most influencers online don't move cases, bottom line. They're good at gaming the system but they are but a sliver of a consumer's overall purchase decision. I think smart marketers know better, though, because even in our space most of the “Top” thinkers don't get any respect; it's typically the unemployed and junior folks helping them maintain their status vs., oh, I dunno, any major brand giving them props for great thinking or work.

  • dbinkowski 8:30 am on April 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Marketing,   

    RIP Social Media Expert, c. 2010 

    This post originally appeared on David Binkowski’s blog and was repurposed for Shamable.

    I’ve been telling clients that 2010 is going to be the year of accountability as it relates to social media. This means  accountability using real numbers (read as: sales) and not fluff (read as: Twiggler.net says we reached 2,001,450 Twitterers with those 3 re-tweets!!1!). With this accountability would come the fall of the social media expert. Talk can only take you so far before it hits the fan and you’re called out. That doesn’t mean the “experts” are going away, though, at least not without a fight.

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    • Vinny 12:56 pm on April 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I've always found the idea of a social media expert to be contradictory anyway. Most of these guys are communitytards. Everything is done by a community vote through community input and there's this egalitarian bent to everything. Then all of a sudden people put themselves up there at the top of that pyramid and call themselves experts. Translation: this is an equal community, but I'm at the top of it. How did I get there? Because I said so.I hope you're right and 2010 becomes the end of the social media expert.

    • ScottyHendo 1:32 pm on April 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      You exactly right – the finish line of success is different for each person. The past couple years of the social media gold rush has deluded people into believing follower count, daily blog posts, and conference gigs were the metrics of success. I'm glad to seeing a maturation happening in this space with those false metrics falling away as the core accountability metrics (create more leads, retain more clients, generate more sales, etc.) reassert themselves as the numbers that really matter.

    • ronshulkin 1:54 pm on April 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Love it, David. It seems so obvious that if you listen carefully, plan analytically and act both responsibly and with integrity, you'll nurture strong relationships and likely embrace success. Oh yeah, a little creativity combined with the informed opinions generated by experience helps too.

    • Don Martelli 12:41 pm on April 13, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I've read this post about three times now and it resonates more and more each time I read it. This is so, so, so true Dave. I wish people would just cut out the bullshit and just get down to work. Stop talking and do more work for your clients. Drive business. Make them money and in turn, you'll get the credit in the form of raises, bonuses, kudo's from clients/colleagues, etc. That's the real juice.

    • Alicia B. 8:17 pm on April 19, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      “I use social media the way ordinary people use it. It’s the combination of New York business with Silicon Valley innovation balanced by Midwest common sense that clients love me…”This prove you're well-rounded, and anyone in social media needs to be just as well-rounded. So they can tweet. Big deal. They need to be able to listen, engage, respect, measure and champion new ideas in a space that will draw attention to a product/service, which translates to increased awareness and sales. To simply say, “I'm on Twitter now” means nothing. How are you using Twitter? You need to know your plan of action for each social media outlet. And it's more than getting followers. It's about reach and conversation. And yes, it does link back to sales. I welcome a change to these so-called experts. Because if you can't measure it, how can you justify it? And how can you prove your efforts have been worthwhile? — Alicia@leximaven

  • dbinkowski 12:52 pm on February 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: fastmall, iphone app   

    Calling BS on FastMall Hype 

    There’s a story on Mashable about a new iPhone app called FastMall that provides maps of malls and even lets people check in, a la Foursquare. As Christina points out, this might be useful if it can scale into other location-based locations, such as amusement parks. That being said, the research I’ve seen around travel says that people want to have unique and customized experiences like stumbling across a wonderful boutique or restaurant without a map – something that the homogenous mall and iPhone apps can’t provide. I’m not suggesting this app will fail (the name implies it is focused on malls only), however it does seem to be quite misguided. Here’s why.

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    • brentsherman 8:52 pm on February 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I don't know whats the issue… I saw http://www.fastmall.com to learn about the app…Look at the bottom. they mention: Hospitals, Airports, Conventions or conferences and Theme Parks are in the works… I think this FastMall app is the 1st of many to come from them.

    • dbinkowski 3:21 pm on March 3, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      But why create 10 separate apps? Seems like a shotgun approach instead of creating one robust or useful app.

  • dbinkowski 8:30 am on February 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: location based services, microblogging   

    Why Foursquare Will Trump Twitter 

    If you scan blogs and read MSM for news you would think Twitter was used by everyone under the sun and Facebook was a close second. the reality is that Facebook just eclipses the 400 million user mark – and unlike Myspace, there aren’t very many dormant accounts inflating that number. Steve Rubel points out the strategy for Facebook, which is something I’ve told clients for a while now – they want to own the internet. Twitter, even with all of the hype and media push, is and will always be a “macro niche” tool. (Look at me! I’m a web 2.0 expert who’s coining new words! Where’s my book deal!? :P)

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    • addodd 5:42 pm on February 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      maybe the question is “where are you spending your time (and money)”.

    • Don Martelli 6:16 pm on February 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Good post @dbinkowski. I don't think 4SQ will trump Twitter, but rather one of them will buy the other. Then Facebook will buy the new entity. Then google will buy facebook. lol.

    • David Binkowski 8:09 pm on February 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      @addodd I would agree however Twitter's not built for business. Between Facebook's status updates and Foursquare's usefulness and adoption by a younger audience I don't see how Twitter will continue to sustain growth, especially with a lack of a viable business model.@Don Maybe AOL will acquire Twitter in an effort to produce the biggest has-been site of all time. 😛 In all seriousness, Facebook has status updates and a boatload more users, and all Google has to do is turn on a microblogging feature and it's lights out for Twitter.

    • Vinny O'Hare 9:14 pm on February 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I don't see 4square becoming anything than what it is right now and that is annoying. If you are following anyone on twitter that uses 4square you want to unfollow them when they check in every 30 minutes. Do I really need someone to know where I am at all. If I did I could just tweet out my location. Having a database follow me id absurd, what if a crime was committed in or at the address I just checked in from? Will they share that with the police? I could end up as a witness to something I knew nothing about. I could go on and on but I think I will save it for a blog post. 🙂

    • David Binkowski 9:28 pm on February 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      @Vinny Thanks for the comment, Vinny. And I hear you regarding privacy concerns, however people said the same thing about Twitter re: it being annoying. Unlike Twitter, Foursquare is intuitive. And unlike reading endless mind-numbing tweets or giving away your location, you can turn off broadcasting your location to Facebook, Twitter, and even your Foursquare friends so no need to sweat the late night Columbo knock at your door. I agree that it's annoying to a certain extent but after I turned off notifications on my iPhone it's much more fun – which one can't say about Twitter's lame hashtag memes et al.

    • johnakerson 3:51 pm on March 1, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      There is a continnuum:Twitter= What are you doingFoursquare = Where are youThere are other killer apps that could be built. They would answer other questions like:”what are you spending on””what do you want””What do you hate” (which may already be encompassed by Yelp)It is a shame that Microsoft didn't build “Where do you want to go” when they used that as their slogan.-J

    • Hans Dieter Mundt 10:03 am on March 2, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      It is always sold as a convenience at first. Then later do you find out you lost more than you gained with it. Many of these sites receive funding from places like In Q Tel and various other front companies in the intelligence business looking for ways to scrap data or mine for location/intelligence data. Its an easy way at first for you to buy into being tracked wherever you are because you think it is somehow cool to use such tools. For them all they need to do is build a great db of as many people as they can, then soon enough you find that everyone knows where you are at any given moment, on top of what you are doing right now, when you woke up, what you had for breakfast, and what you will have for dinner. Eventually after mining that data for a few months the powers that be have a huge profile on you and know most of everything there is to know about you. While most would say this is OK right now, later you will find yourself losing key points of your own identity, and sooner or later you can/will be used in a variety of ways by those intelligence agencies or anyone else for that matter that are looking for an identity to use for some assassination plot or worse. Of course it wasn't you, but then again at what point will you have a given alibi for it since they know exactly where you were at any given point and can manipulate that data to their will.Think about it..http://www.thecoldspy.com

  • dbinkowski 9:00 am on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Fact: Social Media Can't Save Your Business 

    I have been wanting to write this post for a while now after reading someone say that Dell is a case study for how companies should engage in social media. For shits and giggles I decided to look at Dell’s stock price, which once traded as high as $42 a share and now hovers around $14, and then though “if they’re the case study, what about those companies actually making money?”. And with the close of 2009 it’s the perfect time to look at the performance of America’s top companies and see how many of them in the top 10 and bottom 10 are using social media, and to what affect it has on their business. Without further adieu, I present my argument.

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    • ShellyKramer 2:27 pm on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      What an interesting read, David. And you most definitely have a point. Oftentimes people think, incorrectly, that social media is the be all, end all solution – and, as we both know, it is not. Great thoughts – thanks for sharing.

    • David Binkowski 3:11 pm on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Shelly. Based on the amount of coverage it gets you'd think it was a silver bullet, could feed the homeless, cure cancer, reverse global warming, provide fuel efficiency and balance the budget!

  • dbinkowski 9:00 am on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Fact: Social Media Can’t Save Your Business 

    I have been wanting to write this post for a while now after reading someone say that Dell is a case study for how companies should engage in social media. For shits and giggles I decided to look at Dell’s stock price, which once traded as high as $42 a share and now hovers around $14, and then though “if they’re the case study, what about those companies actually making money?”. And with the close of 2009 it’s the perfect time to look at the performance of America’s top companies and see how many of them in the top 10 and bottom 10 are using social media, and to what affect it has on their business. Without further adieu, I present my argument.

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    • ShellyKramer 2:27 pm on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      What an interesting read, David. And you most definitely have a point. Oftentimes people think, incorrectly, that social media is the be all, end all solution – and, as we both know, it is not. Great thoughts – thanks for sharing.

    • David Binkowski 3:11 pm on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Shelly. Based on the amount of coverage it gets you'd think it was a silver bullet, could feed the homeless, cure cancer, reverse global warming, provide fuel efficiency and balance the budget!

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