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  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Old Spice Social Media Buzz Doesn’t Equal Sales 

    For the love of God, put your shirt on.

    For the longest time I used to think that PR agencies didn’t get social media. “Give me impressions!” was the public relations mantra because it meant that they could easily transfer their knowledge of publication circulation multipliers into the emerging field called “social media”. Screw the long tail, screw review web sites, screw message boards and all of the other “unimportant” groups online because “they don’t have reach”.

    “We want to take on the ad agencies head on!” was the PR agency rallying cry, and even though most ad agencies are going down the wrong route, and no matter how many decks you presented to them that this gimmick marketing was the wrong approach, they continued to push to ignore the long tail, ignore communities and ignore what actually drives sales. What’s come full circle is that the coveted social media reach play online that ad agencies have been great at have one thing in common: they don’t work.

    (More …)

     
    • quikness 2:31 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was at a roundtable discussion recently where i brought up the report that this campaign hasn't translated into sales and got a pretty good response from one of the other attendees: deodorant or soap isn't something you rush out to buy. You buy it when you run out.If Old Spice can keep this train rolling for another month or two they just might get the sales uptick they're ultimately looking for. And by all accounts, that seems to be what they are trying to do. Its like an all out assault.

    • Marc Meyer 3:23 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe we need to hear from P&G or Wieden. What was the purpose? If it was Buzz only-then it was a home run. If it was to drive sales to a product that still smells the same as it did when my Dad wore it..then we know the answer. Riddle me this, how much of this social blitz was actually about the product?

    • dbinkowski 5:01 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shouldn't the goal always tie back to sales? The rest is just noise and stuff that the trades and award-givers go nuts for.

    • c2cmom 10:48 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, the success should be tied to sales and business impact, and ditto quikness. I disagree that they missed their mark and audience. Old Spice succeeded in resurrecting a tired product to hotness. Hot guy with sense of humor = sexy for millions of wives and girlfriends across the country. While Twitter and YouTube are immediate mediums, the use of deodorant and bodysoap have a slower cycle, and are not purchased on a daily basis, like say, coffee, which could be measured and evaluated within maybe a week. Besides, who purchases deodorant or body soap for most households? 😉 Old Spice at BlogHer makes a lot of sense to buoy the brand and continue the buzz among the women purchasing the wash.Mark, if that's the case, I bet there are millions of 20-something or 30-something year old gals with subliminal memories of the security and manliness of their dads with Old Spice. As right or wrong as that may be . . .;-) On the other hand, that could also be why they weren't focusing on the scent in this campaign to reinvigorate the brand.Either way, when I was on a panel about why and when moms choose to talk about brands and products via social media at the Yahoo! Mother Board Summit last week, as soon as I mentioned the Old Spice campaign, the room of 60 educated and thoughtful women from around the country – many of whom I imagine have disposable income – lit up momentarily. Sharing hubbies and old boyfriends whom used it, laughing about the different videos. Bullseye. Ya know what else? I actually stopped to check it out (price, scent, ingredients) while at CVS for cotton balls today. Not proud. Not ashamed either.

    • Peter Çoopèr 9:21 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah, because all forms of marketing and branding are about selling products within weeks of exposure. Or not. This is a long term game.

    • Soup 9:22 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I bought deodorant today and laughed when I saw the Old Spice. I didn't buy it because I don't like how it smells. Simple as that. Loved the campaign though. Being entertaining doesn't make me want to buy your product unless your product is entertainment.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Motherhood Uncensored 12:56 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      No hot guy on a horse is going to change the fact that it smells like crap. I agree that it was aimed at the wrong crowd. No doubt, it's funny and somewhat entertaining, but would it make me or my husband (who buys his own darn body wash and deo) go out and buy it? No way. They were banking on stats (and maybe rightfully so) that women do all the household buying. So maybe I should be offended that Old Spice thought I'd be so swayed by the sexy man to run out and buy it for mine.I've heard differing numbers on whether this campaign actually did well or not, but overall, I think it did well for brand awareness, but changing what's been ingrained in our heads over the years “Old Spice is for old dudes,” I still think that.

    • dbinkowski 8:54 pm on July 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well, they quickly rushed to the trades to justify their campaign and reported sales were up. However, the fact that the product is also heavily discounted wasn't really mentioned. In a crap economy, cheapest product wins, not “those with the most tweets”.

    • karimkanji 3:14 pm on August 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      You say it was a failure but you use only opinion and not facts. What about the increase in sales that was reported? Would love your thoughts and analysis on this.

      kk

      • dbinkowski 4:56 pm on October 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment! There are two facts that are true:

        1. The brand was heavily discounted during this time period. Social media or not, consumers are looking to save money and a 1/2 price item within a category doesn’t need social media to sell.

        2. The ROI of this campaign has yet to be proven. Yes, there were sales and yes they used social media, however at what cost and what return? Until those factors have been added in it’s way too premature for the agency that created it to be pitching trades on what a huge success this was by simply showing Nielsen data on sales. If the product was a loss leader then it’s not a “win” IMO.

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Old Spice Social Media Buzz Doesn't Equal Sales 

    For the love of God, put your shirt on.

    For the longest time I used to think that PR agencies didn’t get social media. “Give me impressions!” was the public relations mantra because it meant that they could easily transfer their knowledge of publication circulation multipliers into the emerging field called “social media”. Screw the long tail, screw review web sites, screw message boards and all of the other “unimportant” groups online because “they don’t have reach”.

    “We want to take on the ad agencies head on!” was the PR agency rallying cry, and even though most ad agencies are going down the wrong route, and no matter how many decks you presented to them that this gimmick marketing was the wrong approach, they continued to push to ignore the long tail, ignore communities and ignore what actually drives sales. What’s come full circle is that the coveted social media reach play online that ad agencies have been great at have one thing in common: they don’t work.

    (More …)

     
    • quikness 2:31 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was at a roundtable discussion recently where i brought up the report that this campaign hasn't translated into sales and got a pretty good response from one of the other attendees: deodorant or soap isn't something you rush out to buy. You buy it when you run out.If Old Spice can keep this train rolling for another month or two they just might get the sales uptick they're ultimately looking for. And by all accounts, that seems to be what they are trying to do. Its like an all out assault.

    • Marc Meyer 3:23 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Maybe we need to hear from P&G or Wieden. What was the purpose? If it was Buzz only-then it was a home run. If it was to drive sales to a product that still smells the same as it did when my Dad wore it..then we know the answer. Riddle me this, how much of this social blitz was actually about the product?

    • dbinkowski 5:01 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Shouldn't the goal always tie back to sales? The rest is just noise and stuff that the trades and award-givers go nuts for.

    • c2cmom 10:48 pm on July 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yes, the success should be tied to sales and business impact, and ditto quikness. I disagree that they missed their mark and audience. Old Spice succeeded in resurrecting a tired product to hotness. Hot guy with sense of humor = sexy for millions of wives and girlfriends across the country. While Twitter and YouTube are immediate mediums, the use of deodorant and bodysoap have a slower cycle, and are not purchased on a daily basis, like say, coffee, which could be measured and evaluated within maybe a week. Besides, who purchases deodorant or body soap for most households? 😉 Old Spice at BlogHer makes a lot of sense to buoy the brand and continue the buzz among the women purchasing the wash.Mark, if that's the case, I bet there are millions of 20-something or 30-something year old gals with subliminal memories of the security and manliness of their dads with Old Spice. As right or wrong as that may be . . .;-) On the other hand, that could also be why they weren't focusing on the scent in this campaign to reinvigorate the brand.Either way, when I was on a panel about why and when moms choose to talk about brands and products via social media at the Yahoo! Mother Board Summit last week, as soon as I mentioned the Old Spice campaign, the room of 60 educated and thoughtful women from around the country – many of whom I imagine have disposable income – lit up momentarily. Sharing hubbies and old boyfriends whom used it, laughing about the different videos. Bullseye. Ya know what else? I actually stopped to check it out (price, scent, ingredients) while at CVS for cotton balls today. Not proud. Not ashamed either.

    • Peter Çoopèr 9:21 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Yeah, because all forms of marketing and branding are about selling products within weeks of exposure. Or not. This is a long term game.

    • Soup 9:22 pm on July 24, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I bought deodorant today and laughed when I saw the Old Spice. I didn't buy it because I don't like how it smells. Simple as that. Loved the campaign though. Being entertaining doesn't make me want to buy your product unless your product is entertainment.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Kelly Whalen 12:40 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The news that it didn't turn into sales was prior to the latest viral campaign. Based on what I read the 7% down figure was from June 2009-2010. The past month Nielsen reported a growth of 107% in sales.Despite getting the facts mixed up (don't worry not blaming you-it's going around!), I understand your points, but have to disagree.I'm the one that does the shopping for almost everything in the house including my husband's body wash, and it's what I picked up while I was in the store this week mainly because of the campaign.I'm betting they will do the donation, since Alyssa did use her vast following, and time to respond to the campaign.I would welcome an Old Spice guy appearance at BlogHer, though I'm sure it would cause mass hysteria.

    • Motherhood Uncensored 12:56 am on July 26, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      No hot guy on a horse is going to change the fact that it smells like crap. I agree that it was aimed at the wrong crowd. No doubt, it's funny and somewhat entertaining, but would it make me or my husband (who buys his own darn body wash and deo) go out and buy it? No way. They were banking on stats (and maybe rightfully so) that women do all the household buying. So maybe I should be offended that Old Spice thought I'd be so swayed by the sexy man to run out and buy it for mine.I've heard differing numbers on whether this campaign actually did well or not, but overall, I think it did well for brand awareness, but changing what's been ingrained in our heads over the years “Old Spice is for old dudes,” I still think that.

    • dbinkowski 8:54 pm on July 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Well, they quickly rushed to the trades to justify their campaign and reported sales were up. However, the fact that the product is also heavily discounted wasn't really mentioned. In a crap economy, cheapest product wins, not “those with the most tweets”.

    • karimkanji 3:14 pm on August 27, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      You say it was a failure but you use only opinion and not facts. What about the increase in sales that was reported? Would love your thoughts and analysis on this.

      kk

      • dbinkowski 4:56 pm on October 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment! There are two facts that are true:

        1. The brand was heavily discounted during this time period. Social media or not, consumers are looking to save money and a 1/2 price item within a category doesn’t need social media to sell.

        2. The ROI of this campaign has yet to be proven. Yes, there were sales and yes they used social media, however at what cost and what return? Until those factors have been added in it’s way too premature for the agency that created it to be pitching trades on what a huge success this was by simply showing Nielsen data on sales. If the product was a loss leader then it’s not a “win” IMO.

  • dbinkowski 10:09 am on July 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , influencer project, izea, , , todd and   

    Fast Company’s Influence Project Is A Complete Sham 

    For anyone following this meme on Twitter, Fast Company recently launched a site called “Influence Project”, where they’re essentially pitting online “influencers” against one another to vote for their influencer ranking. The Project is being pushed left and right on Twitter and Facebook and I’m sure elsewhere, but at this point I’ve tuned out from it, not because I don’t want to vote for my friends but because it’s like watching cattle being lined up onto a conveyor belt only to be lead to slaughter.

    (More …)

     
    • Jeff Tippett 3:59 pm on July 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Trolling around for posts on the Influencer Project. Thanks for posting.

    • Anna Viele 7:48 pm on July 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      I was wondering what that was. Makes sense. They will still need content producers, but they won't need people who make a business of showing people who the influnecers are, or how to be influential, or whose business is “influence.”

    • Krista Neher 10:21 pm on July 9, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Great post! Part of the issue is that REAL influencers rise to the top naturally through their actual influence whereas in most of the examples you mention it is more about a popularity contest. The most popular people (or those who can be bothered to harass their friends to vote for them) are not usually actually the most influential.Additionally, many companies who try to leverage influencers totally miss the mark by assuming that “influencers” will pimp their audiences in return for free product. Real influencers have it because they don't do that (and they probably also have better things to do then harass people to vote for them).On a side note, we should launch the Social Media Cool Kids Awards – to enter you have to link to my site 10 times and also drive your friends to my blog to vote. You also have to give me your entire email address book to add to my mailing list. You In? </sarcasm>

    • dbinkowski 4:32 pm on July 10, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Exactly. Most influencers online don't move cases, bottom line. They're good at gaming the system but they are but a sliver of a consumer's overall purchase decision. I think smart marketers know better, though, because even in our space most of the “Top” thinkers don't get any respect; it's typically the unemployed and junior folks helping them maintain their status vs., oh, I dunno, any major brand giving them props for great thinking or work.

  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on June 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    It’s Time for Me to Zag 

    Wayne Gretzky has one of the greatest sayings of all time that has stuck with me since I heard it several years ago. When asked what the difference between a good hockey player and a great hockey player was, he said, “A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be.”

    I’m not comparing myself to the Great One by any stretch of the imagination. However, if you’ve read my blog posts and pay attention to the agency world – and most important, listen to your clients – you know the business is changing fast. A few companies are growing larger and larger while others are starting up, shifting focus or being bought. The lines between advertising, PR and digital agencies has been blurred so badly that it’s difficult to really tell what their differentiation really is. The PR firm has hired digital teams, the ad agencies now have PR folks and the digital shops, well, they claim to be able to do everything the other two can do but better. Which totally makes sense given their long time lines, production-shop mentality and outsourcing. Oh wait — it doesn’t.

    I still think PR has the leg up because of their ability to respond quickly with messaging, something the other shops will only see as a “bolt on” solution for clients. “Make this ad (or website) ‘PR-able!'” is a request I’ve heard all too many times from the large players, who are raking in millions of dollars for creative, only to watch it fall flat because the smart sounding British dudes in funky glasses oversold the impact their widget would have. “EVERYONE WILL BE DOWNLOADING YOUR WIDGET!” they’d say. The whole thing has clients heads spinning and this is before you even factor in social media-specific shops, also known as the dodo bird of the agency world.

    Back to large agencies for a second: In certain instances, it makes a lot of sense for a multinational business that spans many continents to hire a large agency because they need the scale and as such can negotiate competitive rates. This makes procurement happy because it’s one contract with one holding company and theoretically they’re saving a few bucks. I’ve yet to see this model work flawlessly as typically campaigns are customized and executed differently in local markets, but I digress.

    Conversely, there are companies (and marketers) looking to smaller firms that can be nimble, provide senior level thinking and attention on a regular basis to help guide them through the ever changing business and marketing landscape while providing the creativity and speed that their multinational counterparts can’t offer.  I truly believe the agency world is changing and that while for the past several years I’ve worked at the former, it’s time to go where the puck is going. It’s with that that I’m happy to announce that I will be joining an independent, smaller firm next week where I will have control and authority to do some pretty remarkable things beyond what one discipline with a bolt-on solution can offer.

    Which one? Well, I’m not going to let the cat out of the bag just yet. Needless to say that after six years and four months with the only agency I’ve ever known it’s going to be a different world for me. I’ve had a lot of great opportunities with MS&L and got to show the world’s largest companies my marketing chops and for that I will be eternally grateful. I’ve worked with some brilliant people and have had access to C-level executives, brand managers, marketing directors and clients that most agencies dream of. The journey has been difficult, long and at times extremely challenging but it’s one that I believe has prepared me for this new opportunity. I’ve played “intrapreneur”, if you will, for years, within a big company — so it will be a lot of fun to build a business again, this time on a much different scale with new partners and clients.

    I’ll spill the beans soon on where I’m headed once the time is right. Until then, I’ll continue to zag while everyone else zigs.

     
  • dbinkowski 8:30 am on April 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    RIP Social Media Expert, c. 2010 

    I’ve been telling clients that 2010 is going to be the year of accountability as it relates to social media. This means  accountability using real numbers (read as: sales) and not fluff (read as: Twiggler.net says we reached 2,001,450 Twitterers with those 3 re-tweets!!1!). With this accountability would come the fall of the social media expert. Talk can only take you so far before it hits the fan and you’re called out. That doesn’t mean the “experts” are going away, though, at least not without a fight.

    (More …)

     
    • Rich Becker 6:26 pm on April 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      David,

      While I usually shrug off something is dead posts, this one rings true enough. Most social media folks have shifted to get beyond the business of being the guru of all things online. Most had too.

      Years ago, I always told several of them that when public relations and advertising agencies began to populate the Web, they would eventually be asked to integrate social media into everything else they do.

      Since, it seems much like you said. The social media ‘experts” have shifted toward being motivational speakers and personal branding coaches. In many cases, it is what drives their popularity.

      All my best,
      Rich

    • Ben 6:38 pm on April 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Great post David. It does seem like market forces are pushing the pendulum away from hype and toward basic business fundamentals and accountability. We love that. It is a lot more fun to do work with our customers and partners that is about how earned media can propel their business forward rather than about how one can acquire 100,000 Twitter followers in a week. It’s the difference between companies and firms that are oriented toward addressing strategic issues (eg. gaining market share, increasing top-line revenues) before diving into tactics (eg. Facebook Fan Page) and the individuals and groups that mistook the former for the latter.

    • Mike Rowland 7:25 pm on April 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      In the end, it’s always about accountability and results, isn’t it? Fluff appears to work up to a point, but then if you cannot provide real business results you have not accomplished what you were hired for. That is a point that most Social Media Gurus, Experts, etc. seem to miss. What are 5,000 Twitter followers worth on the open market anyway? Nothing unless they are your target audience and your tactics (not strategy) actually helps them to unmask themselves to your client and take an action that results in a measurable event. We’ve been preaching that since the days of the first online communities, through the blog evolution, through the social network introductions, the video channel hype, and the microblogging craze. Glad to read someone with similar thoughts.

    • Jack 1:26 am on April 22, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The space is occupied by a lot of amateurs who don’t understand metrics and or how to use them.

      Brands share some of the blame because they were quick to kick over incremental dollars with little to no oversight.

      There are still solid opportunities to make money within social media but those are more limited. And the reality is that only a few earn enough to be considered significant and or noteworthy.

    • BURN LIST 8:17 pm on April 23, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Ohh that is pretty sweeet. Thanks for sharing. Nice to see a cool site again in this industry.

      –BurnList–

    • Lynnelle 1:36 am on June 10, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      The rise of the Social Media Expert seems to mirror that of the Life and then Executive Coach a decade + ago.

  • dbinkowski 3:56 pm on July 26, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , twitter 101   

    How you know Twitter is doomed 

    Check out the launch of Twitter 101 for Businesses, aka “No, really, you should be on here!”:

    http://bit.ly/yNB8b

    Talk about a horrible set up to future cost implementation. The site’s not scalable, people drop it like a bad habit and there are security flaws. Sure, my clients would be thrilled to pay for that!

     
  • dbinkowski 4:05 am on July 16, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: bl ochman, , social networking,   

    Social media strategy today at large companies 

    I’ve been reading a lot of posts and tweets about how companies need to “get with the times” and stop thinking about social media from a short-term perspective. BL has a post that outlines some of the short term thinking that’s gone on in the evolution and embrace of the medium. Let’s get something straight – it’s being embraced.

    Someone asked me back in 2005 how I got clients to “buy in” to running what were then called word of mouth campaigns and my response was “someone willing to take a risk”. By risk I didn’t mean one that could get them fired, but one that intrinsically felt like the right thing to do. Time, research and measurement tools have proven those brave marketers and communicators right, however the game has changed significantly since then. Sure, you may have gone to a conference recently and heard that some big Fortune 500 isn’t sure how this whole social media thing works. As someone who works with them daily, I’m here to tell you — that is purely a myth.

    Yes, there are companies that haven’t engaged — but with good reason. I actually heard a prominent Twitterer (nice distinction) tell a Fortune 500 that “all of you and your brands should be on Twitter”. I guess that’s the difference between being a professional Tweeter and actually working on client business — those of us in the trenches, working on said business, through the org charts and politics and mess of who owns what, actually know the difference between a communications objective for a non-regulated industry and those that have severe restrictions and limited guidance from regulatory officials imposed on them. Bottom line is that when you ask ignorant folks who live in a small, social media bubble for their advice you’ll get their limited knowledge.

    BL makes a good point that this is a long term strategy, but as she and I had it out a while ago on her blog on the Twitter debate re: brands engaging, it’s recently just started to make sense for brands to incorporate it into their marketing and communications. It’s called critical mass.

    Sure, the minority of vocal Twitterers can easily cause your brand headaches (see: Motrin Moms), but the reality is that most people aren’t using Twitter and are probably over on Facebook. And they still deserve the same respect and attention that Twitterers get from the likes of @comcastcares, @jetblue and the rest. In fact, I’d argue those who haven’t bought in on the latest social media marketing craze deserve more.

    So are big companies really engaging in social media? Yes. And are they trying to do things properly and not have disparate channels, voices, personalities, processes and metrics around it? Yes. And are they trying to figure out that the bad advice many of the so-called “experts” are giving don’t really apply to their brand, company and structure? You betcha.

     
  • dbinkowski 2:16 am on June 21, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , prsa,   

    2 more speaking gigs lined up: one for P… 

    2 more speaking gigs lined up: one for PRSA (Advanced Twitter course) on July 16th and another at http://www.typeamomconference.com in September (24-27), 2009.

     
  • dbinkowski 4:09 am on June 10, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    The cat’s out of the bag on this one: I… 

    The cat’s out of the bag on this one: I’m speaking on June 17th at the NY Social Media Club http://bit.ly/13r8BM

     
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