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  • dbinkowski 10:56 am on August 8, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: facebook, jason alexander, narcissism, psychological disorders, social media experts, spike jones   

    Facebook Use May Lead to Psychological Disorders in Teens 

    This Mashable article reminds me of the Gen Y “Make me famous” syndrome, where Jason Alexander once said:

    I once went to speak at a school, and there was a 16-year-old girl. And the girl says to me, “You know what? I don’t care what I do, I just want to be famous.”

    And I thought, you know, I should really just shoot her in the head because it would serve two things: It would make her famous as the girl that Jason Alexander shot in the head, and it would, you know, spare the world of the banality of the rest of her life.

    And as my friend Spike Jones points out, this may be true of social media experts as well.

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  • dbinkowski 8:34 pm on March 31, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: facebook, , ,   

    Google Slowly Unveiling Its Social Strategy with +1 

    The takeaway? Facebook has no redeeming innovations or qualities that make you HAVE to use it, other than the fact that “my friends are there”. Well, your friends were once at the mall, the roller rink and MySpace. They’ll go elsewhere if someone builds a better mousetrap. Google provides useful tools that simplify the web experience in crucial areas of your life – yes, including search (knowledge). Can you see it unfolding now? I can. +1 just brought in your friends, web site’s analytics and social graph… Now if they can just get your friends there. 😉

     
  • dbinkowski 4:17 pm on March 17, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: facebook, , , social   

    Google’s Latest Social Effort Takes on… Microsoft? 

    It seems like every time Google experiments with social folks assume it’s to take aim at Facebook. In reality, their latest collaboration feature that allows comments within Google Docs is a strike directly at Microsoft. I was quoted on this topic in today’s Ecommerce Times.

     
  • dbinkowski 12:23 pm on November 4, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: facebook,   

    Facebook Deals Just Ate Foursquare’s Lunch 

    Facebook announced yesterday that they’re rolling out Deals, a location-based couponing and fund raising system. There are two types of Deals that can be had via their Places feature: coupons and charity. Basically, if consumers check in they unlock a deal or are helping to raise money for a cause. Sound familiar? It should, except this has real potential to take off in a big way.

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  • dbinkowski 9:30 am on May 17, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , facebook, , location-based   

    5 Ways Location-Based Social Networks Get Really, Really Creepy 

    An article in AdAge by called “How Location-Based Social Networking Gets Creepy” shows the peril of an imaginative (and somewhat perverse) scenario for the author, Jim Louderback. In this article Jim’s alleged pedophile neighbor became mayor of the local elementary school but turned out to be a decent guy. The article points out one potential situation where putting certain information out to a network of friends can be misread. Given the news that Facebook will be also unleashing location-based checkins, it’s worth shining the spotlight on a few more real perils that could be misread when using location-based networks.

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  • dbinkowski 9:00 am on April 21, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: F8, facebook, privacy   

    Facebook F8 Announcements — and What It Really Means 

    Facebook F8GigaOm has a great blog post previewing what Facebook will be launching today at their F8 conference. In short, they’re launching Facebook Connect 2.0 (auto-logins), the Facebook Presence Bar (think of the one at the bottom of this page), Share/Like buttons, and Facebook Locations, which is their answer to Foursquare. This furthers the notion I’ve been telling clients for a while now: it’s a flat out war between Google and Facebook for your attention and more importantly – your data.

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  • dbinkowski 12:52 am on January 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: facebook, stupid games   

    Facebook Bra Color Game Revealed 

    Men,
    I want to bring to your attention that there’s a “viral” status update game going on via Facebook where your wife, girlfriend or female friends might change their status to a color. It’s to help women spread breast cancer awareness – and I totally get it. So let’s help play along.

    Update your favorite car color in your status to raise awareness that it’s time to change the god damn oil on your favorite car before it’s too late. Go ahead. I’ll start it as a note on Facebook and will tag a few EOT dads. Become a Fan and we’ll tag you back. And make sure your wife gets her boobs checked – that shit is serious.

     
    • Christy Brewer 8:21 am on January 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Okay, I hate chain stuff, memes and stuff that seems like a waste of time at first blush. I never turned my avatar green on Twitter, nor do I do “twibbons.” But, when I got this message from a colleague (hello, Elizabeth!), it seemed like a great way to tell some of my friends to get an exam, mammogram, or whatever. It gave me an excuse to send that message. Brilliant pass-along hook. (But that's a notion for the Shamable blog.)Then, I saw the backlash. Sure, Farmville and Mafia Wars are not my thing, but I don't go around blasting people for putting “stupid stuff” in their status updates. If you're not interested, ignore. Delete. Move on.Yes, it's a stupid game. I've noticed mostly that it's younger people criticizing. But, I know my aunt well. She's older than me. She'll definitely respond to something like this, so HELL YES I'll put “lime green” in my status so she feels more comfortable spreading the word to her friends.Thanks for supporting this, and for hooking all those people with such a provocative title! =]

    • David Binkowski 8:35 am on January 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      As long as it reaches the target who cares what the kids think. Come to think of it, that sounds a lot like my parenting philosophy !:P

    • Christy Brewer 10:21 am on January 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Okay, I hate chain stuff, memes and stuff that seems like a waste of time at first blush. I never turned my avatar green on Twitter, nor do I do “twibbons.” But, when I got this message from a colleague (hello, Elizabeth!), it seemed like a great way to tell some of my friends to get an exam, mammogram, or whatever. It gave me an excuse to send that message. Brilliant pass-along hook. (But that's a notion for the Shamable blog.)Then, I saw the backlash. Sure, Farmville and Mafia Wars are not my thing, but I don't go around blasting people for putting “stupid stuff” in their status updates. If you're not interested, ignore. Delete. Move on.Yes, it's a stupid game. I've noticed mostly that it's younger people criticizing. But, I know my aunt well. She's older than me. She'll definitely respond to something like this, so HELL YES I'll put “lime green” in my status so she feels more comfortable spreading the word to her friends.Thanks for supporting this, and for hooking all those people with such a provocative title! =]

    • David Binkowski 10:35 am on January 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      As long as it reaches the target who cares what the kids think. Come to think of it, that sounds a lot like my parenting philosophy !:P

    • Christy Brewer 2:21 pm on January 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Okay, I hate chain stuff, memes and stuff that seems like a waste of time at first blush. I never turned my avatar green on Twitter, nor do I do “twibbons.” But, when I got this message from a colleague (hello, Elizabeth!), it seemed like a great way to tell some of my friends to get an exam, mammogram, or whatever. It gave me an excuse to send that message. Brilliant pass-along hook. (But that's a notion for the Shamable blog.)Then, I saw the backlash. Sure, Farmville and Mafia Wars are not my thing, but I don't go around blasting people for putting “stupid stuff” in their status updates. If you're not interested, ignore. Delete. Move on.Yes, it's a stupid game. I've noticed mostly that it's younger people criticizing. But, I know my aunt well. She's older than me. She'll definitely respond to something like this, so HELL YES I'll put “lime green” in my status so she feels more comfortable spreading the word to her friends.Thanks for supporting this, and for hooking all those people with such a provocative title! =]

    • David Binkowski 2:35 pm on January 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      As long as it reaches the target who cares what the kids think. Come to think of it, that sounds a lot like my parenting philosophy !:P

  • dbinkowski 2:05 am on August 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: facebook, ,   

    Twitter just became a little more irrelevant 

    Facebook announced that they’re integrating Fan Pages with Twitter and if you want to understand what this means for your business check out Jeremy Pepper’s blog post on it.

    From a “What this means for Twitter” it’s pretty simple – they’re now just a channel that (even more so) drives people away from their site and over to Facebook. It also helps Facebook close the loop on owning your internet experience with brands. Today I linked my Fan Page with my Twitter account and it works seamlessly. Will I post every nonsensical tweet to my Fan Page? No — but I can probably post at least a quarter of what I tweet from my Fan Page, which means Twitter’s monthly impressions just went down. Oh, and as Facebook’s metrics and reporting system matures, don’t be surprised if the return bit.ly links are included in their administrative interface. Also – since Facebook is using bit.ly you currently lose the tracking from those truncated links unless you post your own links via bit.ly or whichever service you use as part of your status update.

    Something else to consider if you are thinking “Great! My company only needs to update once!”:

    Not so fast.

    Sure, it sounds like the ultimate solution for consolidating your Twitter and Facebook accounts. But consider the audiences: People may follow you on Twitter but not be a Fan on Facebook (think subscribing to RSS vs. having an emotional connection to a brand). That’s a quite a difference when it comes to how you interact or choose to engage with a brand, as one (Twitter) may lead to the other (Facebook), but it’s not a given.

     
  • dbinkowski 4:05 am on July 16, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: bl ochman, facebook, social networking,   

    Social media strategy today at large companies 

    I’ve been reading a lot of posts and tweets about how companies need to “get with the times” and stop thinking about social media from a short-term perspective. BL has a post that outlines some of the short term thinking that’s gone on in the evolution and embrace of the medium. Let’s get something straight – it’s being embraced.

    Someone asked me back in 2005 how I got clients to “buy in” to running what were then called word of mouth campaigns and my response was “someone willing to take a risk”. By risk I didn’t mean one that could get them fired, but one that intrinsically felt like the right thing to do. Time, research and measurement tools have proven those brave marketers and communicators right, however the game has changed significantly since then. Sure, you may have gone to a conference recently and heard that some big Fortune 500 isn’t sure how this whole social media thing works. As someone who works with them daily, I’m here to tell you — that is purely a myth.

    Yes, there are companies that haven’t engaged — but with good reason. I actually heard a prominent Twitterer (nice distinction) tell a Fortune 500 that “all of you and your brands should be on Twitter”. I guess that’s the difference between being a professional Tweeter and actually working on client business — those of us in the trenches, working on said business, through the org charts and politics and mess of who owns what, actually know the difference between a communications objective for a non-regulated industry and those that have severe restrictions and limited guidance from regulatory officials imposed on them. Bottom line is that when you ask ignorant folks who live in a small, social media bubble for their advice you’ll get their limited knowledge.

    BL makes a good point that this is a long term strategy, but as she and I had it out a while ago on her blog on the Twitter debate re: brands engaging, it’s recently just started to make sense for brands to incorporate it into their marketing and communications. It’s called critical mass.

    Sure, the minority of vocal Twitterers can easily cause your brand headaches (see: Motrin Moms), but the reality is that most people aren’t using Twitter and are probably over on Facebook. And they still deserve the same respect and attention that Twitterers get from the likes of @comcastcares, @jetblue and the rest. In fact, I’d argue those who haven’t bought in on the latest social media marketing craze deserve more.

    So are big companies really engaging in social media? Yes. And are they trying to do things properly and not have disparate channels, voices, personalities, processes and metrics around it? Yes. And are they trying to figure out that the bad advice many of the so-called “experts” are giving don’t really apply to their brand, company and structure? You betcha.

     
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