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  • dbinkowski 10:07 pm on June 22, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: audi, , roi, social media   

    Can Social Media ROI Be Determined? Yes. Just Don’t Ask Fast Company. 

    I have to take major exception with this article, as those willing to  invest in measurement can put a return on their investment. I’ve preached this for a while now, but if a company like Audi wants to make a difference they need to create, support and empower their dealerships to pick up where the national halo campaigns leave off. That is, if they’re actually willing to change what in the auto industry is typically a bad customer experience. 

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  • dbinkowski 8:34 pm on March 31, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , social media   

    Google Slowly Unveiling Its Social Strategy with +1 

    The takeaway? Facebook has no redeeming innovations or qualities that make you HAVE to use it, other than the fact that “my friends are there”. Well, your friends were once at the mall, the roller rink and MySpace. They’ll go elsewhere if someone builds a better mousetrap. Google provides useful tools that simplify the web experience in crucial areas of your life – yes, including search (knowledge). Can you see it unfolding now? I can. +1 just brought in your friends, web site’s analytics and social graph… Now if they can just get your friends there. 😉

     
  • dbinkowski 4:45 am on February 2, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: bookmarking, , social media, techcrunch   

    Just reading about News.Me and, honestly… 

    Just reading about News.Me and, honestly, the notion that my Twitter followers — and no offense, folks — dictate the news to me just reinforces the lazy, gaming that Klout supports.

    “News.me is a social news reading app that presents the news that the people you follow on Twitter are reading.”

    Read more drivel about it at TechCrunch:

    http://techcrunch.com/2011/02/01/news-me/

     
  • dbinkowski 9:00 am on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , social media   

    Fact: Social Media Can't Save Your Business 

    I have been wanting to write this post for a while now after reading someone say that Dell is a case study for how companies should engage in social media. For shits and giggles I decided to look at Dell’s stock price, which once traded as high as $42 a share and now hovers around $14, and then though “if they’re the case study, what about those companies actually making money?”. And with the close of 2009 it’s the perfect time to look at the performance of America’s top companies and see how many of them in the top 10 and bottom 10 are using social media, and to what affect it has on their business. Without further adieu, I present my argument.

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    • ShellyKramer 2:27 pm on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      What an interesting read, David. And you most definitely have a point. Oftentimes people think, incorrectly, that social media is the be all, end all solution – and, as we both know, it is not. Great thoughts – thanks for sharing.

    • David Binkowski 3:11 pm on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Shelly. Based on the amount of coverage it gets you'd think it was a silver bullet, could feed the homeless, cure cancer, reverse global warming, provide fuel efficiency and balance the budget!

  • dbinkowski 9:00 am on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , social media   

    Fact: Social Media Can’t Save Your Business 

    I have been wanting to write this post for a while now after reading someone say that Dell is a case study for how companies should engage in social media. For shits and giggles I decided to look at Dell’s stock price, which once traded as high as $42 a share and now hovers around $14, and then though “if they’re the case study, what about those companies actually making money?”. And with the close of 2009 it’s the perfect time to look at the performance of America’s top companies and see how many of them in the top 10 and bottom 10 are using social media, and to what affect it has on their business. Without further adieu, I present my argument.

    (More …)

     
    • ShellyKramer 2:27 pm on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      What an interesting read, David. And you most definitely have a point. Oftentimes people think, incorrectly, that social media is the be all, end all solution – and, as we both know, it is not. Great thoughts – thanks for sharing.

    • David Binkowski 3:11 pm on January 12, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks, Shelly. Based on the amount of coverage it gets you'd think it was a silver bullet, could feed the homeless, cure cancer, reverse global warming, provide fuel efficiency and balance the budget!

  • dbinkowski 10:04 am on January 7, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: david meerman scott, harvard business school, social media   

    David Meerman Scott Loses It Over Social Media ROI 

    I was passed along this mp3 interview of David Meerman Scott (h/t @judbranam) being asked what the ROI of Social Media is. He likens social media ROI to measuring billboard or TV advertising and asks “what the return is of having the gardener Guatemalan immigrants out front raking leaves of the corporate headquarters?”. The segment ends with his boast of speaking at Harvard’s Business School so he can tell them that as educators and marketers they’re teaching the wrong thing. “Intent, bloggers talking about you and Google rankings” are things that can help but “don’t have ROI” (paraphrased). So without further adieu, David, I’m calling bullshit on your rant.

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    • Vinny 4:04 pm on January 7, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      And as a marketers I know the folks creating banners online with ridiculously low click through rates are crapping themselves because they’ve realized that a few tweets with the right offer to the right people can drive just as much traffic and sales as their million dollar online ad buy.

      It's, effectively, the difference between a shotgun blast with buckshot and a sniper rifle. If your goal is to hit one target, either can work, and it probably takes much less (resourcewise) to do it with a sniper rifle.In this case, banner ads are the buckshot, but Twitter is the sniper rifle.

    • David Binkowski 4:09 pm on January 7, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Agree 100% Vinny. It *should* take less resources but it typically doesn't. A lot of companies overpay for social media work (see: Don's video) which goes a long way to explain why a CMO would question the ROI. Good marketers can show their return.

    • Don Martelli 12:03 pm on January 8, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      You bring up a good point about companies over paying for social media Dave. The real issue is education. Those that are sheep, typically “think” they have to pay loads of cash for social media “services.” The real issue is education. At the end of the day, should folks like us get paid to “do” social media for companies? Probably not. They should be doing it themselves. With that said, however, it is our role to educate — those are services we can get paid for.”I'm a f-ing social media guru. Pay me lots of money because I'm so f-ing cool.”

  • dbinkowski 2:05 am on August 22, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , social media,   

    Twitter just became a little more irrelevant 

    Facebook announced that they’re integrating Fan Pages with Twitter and if you want to understand what this means for your business check out Jeremy Pepper’s blog post on it.

    From a “What this means for Twitter” it’s pretty simple – they’re now just a channel that (even more so) drives people away from their site and over to Facebook. It also helps Facebook close the loop on owning your internet experience with brands. Today I linked my Fan Page with my Twitter account and it works seamlessly. Will I post every nonsensical tweet to my Fan Page? No — but I can probably post at least a quarter of what I tweet from my Fan Page, which means Twitter’s monthly impressions just went down. Oh, and as Facebook’s metrics and reporting system matures, don’t be surprised if the return bit.ly links are included in their administrative interface. Also – since Facebook is using bit.ly you currently lose the tracking from those truncated links unless you post your own links via bit.ly or whichever service you use as part of your status update.

    Something else to consider if you are thinking “Great! My company only needs to update once!”:

    Not so fast.

    Sure, it sounds like the ultimate solution for consolidating your Twitter and Facebook accounts. But consider the audiences: People may follow you on Twitter but not be a Fan on Facebook (think subscribing to RSS vs. having an emotional connection to a brand). That’s a quite a difference when it comes to how you interact or choose to engage with a brand, as one (Twitter) may lead to the other (Facebook), but it’s not a given.

     
  • dbinkowski 1:19 pm on August 18, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: social media,   

    Contest: Vote for my SXSW Panel 

    I tweeted this earlier but if you go vote for my South by Southwest panel – and I make it – I’ll take you with me. No joke, I have set aside marketing budget and will pay your travel (hotel, flight) and ticket.

    How can you enter?

    Click this link to the SXSW Panel picker, then retweet it and you’re entered to win. You can enter every day, as much as you’d like until the voting ends.

     
  • dbinkowski 10:51 pm on July 26, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: mediabistro, social media   

    The Best Social Media Campaigns Are The Ones You’ve Never Heard Of 

    A few weeks months back I spoke at a MediaBistro/PRNewser event on social media and was asked what my favorite social media campaign was. As a marketer I have a few that deserve the golf clap and some that deserve a standing ovation. I say this because most campaigns aren’t targeted at me, a 35 36 year old, workaholic, white guy. And just to be clear, I’m not supposed to be the target for most of these campaigns. Mass/reach plays don’t typically work when it comes to social media.

    And as I stated on the panel, just because it’s in the trades doesn’t mean it was a good campaign. I’ve been preaching the difference between niche and reach plays in social media for a while now and I’ll say it again for those who skimmed the first paragraph — most reach plays don’t work. Look it up. Papa John’s, Burger King, some cause stuff and what else? Not a heck of a lot of success, but a whole lot of fail.

    That being said, you’ll never see someone give some credit to brands, campaigns and yes, agencies, that have run some pretty great word of mouth campaigns that utilize social media. One reason might be competitive advantage. Another might be because every company is different, as as such their campaigns, results and success aren’t transferable. I’d like you to share your great social media campaigns in the comments of this post.

    I’ll kick it off by giving the answer I gave to the MediaBistro event attendees. The campaign is called Fiskateers, created by Brains on Fire, a branding firm in Greenville Charleston , South Carolina. I met Spike and Geno of BoF through WOMMA and have seen this project since nearly day one of the launch. The concept is simple: Crafters love Fiskars scissors, so let’s give them a space to connect with each other and the brand. Spike recently tweeted that the project delivered $1.6MM in ROI for the brand. Wham-bam, indeed.

     
    • Spike Jones 1:43 pm on July 27, 2009 Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for the sweet, sweet love, David. I love this: “Not a heck of a lot of success, but a whole lot of fail.” How true. Keep on fightin’ the good fight, brother.

      PS We’re in Greenvlle, SC.

      • dbinkowski 9:24 pm on July 27, 2009 Permalink | Reply

        Well deserved, Spike.

        And I meant Greenville but subliminally typed Charleston. Guess it’s time to head back for the Wine & Food Festival! 😉

  • dbinkowski 3:56 pm on July 26, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: social media, , twitter 101   

    How you know Twitter is doomed 

    Check out the launch of Twitter 101 for Businesses, aka “No, really, you should be on here!”:

    http://bit.ly/yNB8b

    Talk about a horrible set up to future cost implementation. The site’s not scalable, people drop it like a bad habit and there are security flaws. Sure, my clients would be thrilled to pay for that!

     
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